Type 23 (Duke Class) Frigate (UK)

Type 23 (Duke Class) Frigate (UK)

Type 23 (Duke Class) Frigate (UK)


The Type 22 frigates are among the most successful warships built for the Royal Navy since 1945, but their continued evolution has led to a ship that is probably closer to a cruiser or destroyer (in terms of capability and cost) than a simple frigate, particularly in their weapons fit. What was needed was a smaller more modest design that could back up the Type 22s and provide the numbers required for the Royal Navy to maintain their out-of-area commitments. Initial design work was started in conjunction with the shipbuilders, and the new design would be known as the Type 23. It was originally designed to act as a platform for a towed sonar array, carry light missile system against air attack and have facilities to land and refuel helicopters, although it would not carry a hangar. This was basically to keep the unit cost to around £70 million and in many ways, resembled the philosophy behind the limited capability Type 14 frigates of the 1950s.

As a result of the Falklands conflict the design was recast, lengthening the hull by 15 meters, adding a hangar for helicopter operations, light automatic guns and the Seawolf missile system. The ship now began to approach the Type 22 for cost and complexity and these were not yet the last changes that would be made. Modifications were made to damage control arrangements, and the ship was divided into five self-contained fire control zones, each with their own fire-fighting equipment, escape routes and electrical power supply. New fireproof materials and non-toxic substances were incorporated into the design, and many areas were armoured against shrapnel damage. Length thus increased to 133 meters overall, and displacement (fully loaded) rose to 3,100 tonnes.

Some of these decisions caused a series of political battles, including selection of the surface-to-surface missile system and the choice of the tracking radar for the Seawolf missile system. To this was also added the eventual cancellation of the CACS-4 and the tendering for a new command system, which meant that the early Type 23s were without a computer command system at all. On top of this, the Government was slow to place orders despite the importance of the Type 23 to the Royal Navy. This caused apprehension to among those dockyards that were looking for work and those in political circles seeking a commitment to maintain a 50-ship destroyer and frigate fleet. Despite the various technical and political problems that have surrounded the Type 23 frigate, the final ship is a well balanced design but also an excellent anti-submarine platform.

Ship Names: Norfolk, Argyll, Lancaster, Marlborough, Iron Duke, Monmouth Montrose, Westminster, Northumberland, Richmond, Somerset, Grafton Sutherland, Kent, Portland, St Albans.


Type 23 frigate

The Type 23 frigate or Duke class is a class of frigates built for the United Kingdom's Royal Navy. The ships are named after British Dukes, thus leading to the class being commonly known as the Duke class. The first Type 23, HMS Norfolk, was commissioned in 1989, and the sixteenth, HMS St Albans was commissioned in June 2002. They form the core of the Royal Navy's destroyer and frigate fleet and serve alongside the Type 45 destroyers. They vessels were designed for anti-submarine warfare, but have been used for a range of uses. [3] Thirteen Type 23 frigates remain in service with the Royal Navy, with three vessels having been sold to the Chilean Navy.

  • Royal Navy
  • Chilean Navy
    :
    • 4 × 1,510 kW (2,025 hp) Paxman Valenta 12CM diesel generators (Non-PGMU ships)
    • 4 × 1,650 kilowatts (2,210 shp) MTU 12V4000 M53 diesel generators (PGMU ships)
    • 2 × GECelectric motors delivering 2,980 kW (3,996 hp) each
    • 2 × Rolls-Royce Marine Spey SM1C delivering 12,750 kW (17,098 hp)
    • UAF-1 ESM or UAT Mod 1
    • Type 182 towed torpedo decoy
    • Anti-air missiles:
      • 1 × 32-cell Sea Ceptor GWS 35 Vertical Launching System (VLS) canisters for 32 missiles (1–25+ km) [2] (replacing original Sea Wolf SAM)
      • 2 × quad Harpoon launchers
      • 2 × twin 12.75 in (324 mm) Sting Ray torpedo tubes
      • 1 × BAE4.5 inch Mk 8 naval gun
      • 2 × 30 mm DS30M Mk2 guns, or, 2 × 30 mm DS30B guns
      • 2 × Miniguns
      • 4 × General-purpose machine guns
      • 1 × Wildcat HMA2, armed with:
      • 2 × anti submarine torpedoes (Martlet and Sea Venom ASM to be fitted in 2021/22)
      • or
      • 1 × Westland Merlin HM2, armed with
      • 4 × anti submarine torpedoes
      • Flight deck
      • Enclosed hangar

      The Royal Navy's current Type 23 frigates will be phased out starting in 2021 and later replaced by the Type 26 Global Combat Ship and the Type 31 frigate. [4] As of 2012 [update] it is planned that HMS St Albans will be the last to retire from the Royal Navy, in 2036. [5] [6]


      UK Defence Forum

      Re: Type 23 Frigate (Duke Class) (RN)

      Post by GibMariner » 17 Sep 2015, 10:24

      shark bait Senior Member Posts: 6107 Joined: 05 May 2015, 21:18 Location:

      Re: Type 23 Frigate (Duke Class) (RN)

      Post by shark bait » 17 Sep 2015, 11:24

      Re: Type 23 Frigate (Duke Class) (RN)

      Post by GibMariner » 17 Sep 2015, 11:48

      It truly quite a remarkable facility. One thing I've been wondering is whether the future Type 26 ships will be able to have their refits done there?

      I can't remember right now, but I think the facility was modified to accommodate the Type 22 Batch II & III - the quoted length for the T26 is 148 m, same as the Batch III T22, if this is the case then I would imagine so.

      On that note, has the length of the Type 26 been limited by this factor?

      marktigger Senior Member Posts: 4621 Joined: 01 May 2015, 10:22 Location:

      Re: Type 23 Frigate (Duke Class) (RN)

      Post by marktigger » 17 Sep 2015, 11:58

      marktigger Senior Member Posts: 4621 Joined: 01 May 2015, 10:22 Location:

      Re: Type 23 Frigate (Duke Class) (RN)

      Post by marktigger » 17 Sep 2015, 11:59

      It truly quite a remarkable facility. One thing I've been wondering is whether the future Type 26 ships will be able to have their refits done there?

      I can't remember right now, but I think the facility was modified to accommodate the Type 22 Batch II & III - the quoted length for the T26 is 148 m, same as the Batch III T22, if this is the case then I would imagine so.

      On that note, has the length of the Type 26 been limited by this factor?

      whats the planned beam on them and their over all height that might be a limiting factor can't see a Type 45 fitting inside because of the height

      Re: Type 23 Frigate (Duke Class) (RN)

      Post by GibMariner » 17 Sep 2015, 12:46

      It truly quite a remarkable facility. One thing I've been wondering is whether the future Type 26 ships will be able to have their refits done there?

      I can't remember right now, but I think the facility was modified to accommodate the Type 22 Batch II & III - the quoted length for the T26 is 148 m, same as the Batch III T22, if this is the case then I would imagine so.

      On that note, has the length of the Type 26 been limited by this factor?

      whats the planned beam on them and their over all height that might be a limiting factor can't see a Type 45 fitting inside because of the height

      No idea about T26 total height, but I believe beam was stated to be 20 metres (Type 23 beam = 16m).

      However, I distinctly remember reading somewhere that the Batch I T22 were limited to a length of around 130 m due to the length of the frigate refit complex at Devonport - which was subsequently lengthened for the Batch III.

      Re: Type 23 Frigate (Duke Class) (RN)

      Post by GibMariner » 18 Sep 2015, 14:24

      Royal Navy frigate HMS Monmouth has marked the end of a 20 month refit following a successful Fleet Date Inspection in Her Majesty’s Naval Base Devonport on Friday 18 September 15.

      HMS Monmouth, known informally as ‘The Black Duke’ after James Scott, the Duke of Monmouth, has recently returned to Devonport following extensive sea trials where Her array of upgraded weapon systems and sensors were fully proven and made ready for operational use.

      Re: Type 23 Frigate (Duke Class) (RN)

      Post by jonas » 19 Sep 2015, 09:22

      All go for Sea Ceptor [DSEi15D4]
      Richard Scott
      18 September 2015

      MBDA has begun delivering hardware for the first Sea Ceptor local anti-air missile system installation after the Royal Navy approved a ‘commit to fitting’ for the Type 23 frigate HMS Argyll.

      Meanwhile, the company has begun a campaign of final qualification firings at the Vidsel range in Sweden of the Common Anti-air Module Munition (CAMM) effector associated with the system.

      ‘‘In May this year I made the decision, with the Ministry of Defence, to commit to the fitting of Sea Ceptor on HMS Argyll,’’ Rear Admiral Alex Burton, assistant chief of the Naval Staff (Ships), told the DSEI Daily during a briefing on board HMS Iron Duke. ‘‘This is a key acknowledgement of the confidence we have in Sea Ceptor to replace the current [GWS 26 Mod 1] Seawolf system. Sea Ceptor provides a significantly improved capability [over Seawolf] and massively reduced whole-life costs.’’ MBDA confirmed that it made a first hardware delivery to Devonport − where Argyll is being refitted − in August this year. A second shipment will follow at the end of 2015.

      The replacement of GWS 26 Mod 1 with Sea Ceptor forms one strand of a wider Capability Sustainment Programme being rolled out for the Type 23s.

      Other aspects include the introduction of the Type 997 E/F-band 3D medium-range radar, which will provide target indication support to the Sea Ceptor system.

      To minimise ship impact, Sea Ceptor installation on the Type 23s has been engineered to use existing GWS 26 Mod 1 infrastructure and interface points. CAMM missiles will be fitted in the existing VL Seawolf silo (one canister per cell for a maximum of 32 missiles).

      The Type 23 Sea Ceptor fit will use two Platform Data Link Terminal (PDLT) equipments, one fore and one aft, to ensure uninterrupted 360° coverage. The PDLT provides for two-way communications between the ship and the CAMM missile target positional updates can be uplinked from the ship to the missile in-flight, while missile status information and diagnostics can be sent back to the ship.


      UK Defence Forum

      SKB Senior Member Posts: 6949 Joined: 30 Apr 2015, 18:35 Location:

      Type 23 Frigate (Duke Class) (RN) [News Only]

      Post by SKB » 02 May 2015, 16:04

      Edit by The Armchair Soldier:

      Please Read Before Posting:
      To prevent important news items from being bogged down by general discussion, we have decided to split this topic. This topic will now be used for news only. You are encouraged to post news in this thread - as well as discuss it - but please do not allow your discussions to meander onto other topics and keep speculation to a minimum.

      For general discussion, please use the newly-created Current & Future Escorts - General Discussion topic. Within that topic, you may discuss the Type 23 more broadly, as well as the current and future escort fleet in general.

      Please Private Message an administrator if you need further clarification on these changes.

      Original post by SKB:


      ^ HMS Sutherland (F81)

      Introduction
      The Type 23 frigate or Duke class is a class of 16 frigates built for the United Kingdom's Royal Navy. The ships are named after British Dukes, thus leading to the class being commonly known as the Duke class. The first Type 23, HMS Norfolk, was commissioned in 1990, and the sixteenth, HMS St Albans was commissioned in June 2002. They form the core of the Royal Navy's destroyer and frigate fleet and serve alongside the Type 45 destroyers.

      Originally designed for anti-submarine warfare in the North Atlantic, the Royal Navy’s Type 23 frigates have proven their versatility in war fighting, peace-keeping and maritime security operations around the globe. Thirteen Type 23 frigates remain in service with the Royal Navy, with three vessels having been sold to Chile and handed over to the Chilean Navy.

      The Royal Navy’s current Type 23 frigates will be replaced by the Global Combat Ship starting from 2021. As of 2012 it is planned that HMS Argyll will be the first Type 23 to retire from the Royal Navy in 2023 while HMS St Albans will be the last, in 2036.


      Development
      When first conceived in the late 1970s, the Type 23 was intended to be a light anti-submarine frigate to counter Soviet nuclear submarines operating in the North Atlantic. The Type 23 would be replacing the Leander class frigates (which had entered service in 1960s) and the Type 21 frigate (a general purpose design that recently entered service) as "the backbone of the Royal Navy's surface ship anti-submarine force". Although not intended to replace the Type 22 frigate, reductions in the size of the Navy due to the 1998 Strategic Defence Review led to HMS St Albans replacing HMS Coventry, a Type 22 frigate.

      The ships were intended to carry a towed array sonar to detect Soviet submarines in the North Atlantic and carry a Westland Lynx or EHI Merlin helicopter to attack them. It was initially proposed that the frigates would not mount defensive armament. Instead the Sea Wolf missile system was to be carried by Fort Victoria class replenishment oilers, one of which was to support typically four Type 23s. The Fort class oilers would also provide servicing facilities for the force's helicopters the Type 23 would have facilities only for rearming and refuelling them.

      As a result of lessons learned from the Falklands War, the design grew in size and complexity to encompass the Vertical Launch Sea Wolf (VLS) system with an extra tracking system as a defence against low-flying aircraft and sea-skimming anti-ship missiles such as Exocet. With the addition of Harpoon surface-to-surface missiles and a medium calibre gun for naval gunfire support, the Type 23 had evolved into a more complex and balanced vessel optimised for general warfare, which introduced a host of new technologies and concepts to the Royal Navy. These included extensive radar cross section reduction design measures, automation to substantially reduce crew size, a Combined diesel-electric and gas (CODLAG) propulsion system providing very quiet running for anti-submarine operations along with excellent range, vertical launch missile technology and a fully distributed combat management system.

      The Vertical Launch Sea Wolf surface-to-air missile system was designed for and first deployed on the Type 23. Unlike conventional Sea Wolf, the missile is boosted vertically until it clears the ship's superstructure and then turns to fly directly to the target. Consequently, the ship's structure does not cause no-fire zones that would delay or inhibit missile firing in a conventionally launched system.

      Although the Type 23 is officially the "Duke" class, and includes such famous names as HMS Iron Duke, (which had been the name of the battleship HMS Iron Duke, Admiral Jellicoe's flagship at the Battle of Jutland), five of the names had previously been used on classes known as the "County class": Kent and Norfolk were names given both to 1960s guided missile destroyers and Second World War-era County class heavy cruisers, while Monmouth, Lancaster, Kent and Argyll revived names carried by First World War-era Monmouth class armoured cruisers. This use of Ducal and County names broke a tradition of alphabetical names for escort ships which had run in two – not unbroken – cycles from the L-class destroyers of 1913 to the Daring-class destroyers of 1950 this progression was revived with the Amazon-class Type 21 frigates of 1972–75, and continued with B and C names for most of the Type 22 frigates of 1976–89. However, the D names have since been used for the new Type 45 Daring-class destroyers, the first of which entered service in 2009.

      It is stated that: "Type 23 frigates achieved approximately 85–89 per cent average availability for operational service in each of the last five years with the exception of 1996 when the figure dropped to just over 80 per cent due to a number of ships experiencing a particular defect. This discounts time spent in planned maintenance."

      Unlike the Type 45 destroyer, the "Type 23 frigate does not have the capability or configuration to act as flagship and is not tasked in this way."


      Upgrades and future technologies

      Mid-life refit
      The class are currently going through mid-life refits which last 12–18 months and cost £15-20m. Aside from refurbishment of the mess decks and drive train, the ships are being fitted with a transom flap which can add up to 1 knot to the top speed and reduce fuel consumption by 13%, and Intersleek anti-fouling paint which added 2 knots to the top speed of Ark Royal. Although the top speed of the Duke class is commonly quoted as 28 knots, the caption of an official Navy photo suggests that Lancaster was capable of 32 knots even before her mid-life refit The Sea Wolf Mid Life Update (SWMLU) improves the sensors and guidance of the missiles, point defences are further improved with new remotely operated 30mm guns, and Mod 1 of the Mk8 main gun has an all-electric loading system and a smaller radar cross-section. The communications and command systems are also upgraded.

      Sonar 2087
      Sonar 2087 is described by its manufacturer as "a towed-array system that enables Type 23 frigates to hunt the latest submarines at considerable distances and locate them beyond the range at which they [submarines] can launch an attack." Sonar 2087 was fitted to eight Type 23 frigates in mid-life refits between 2004 and 2012 the five oldest Type 23 frigates, HMS Montrose, Monmouth, Iron Duke, Lancaster and Argyll are not scheduled to receive Sonar 2087. These ships will instead continue to be employed across the normal range of standing Royal Navy deployments. The Chilean Navy is procuring a number of Sonar 2087 towed arrays from Thales Underwater Systems to equip its multipurpose frigates.

      Type 997 Artisan 3D radar
      The Type 23's medium range radar will be replaced by BAE Systems Insyte Type 997 Artisan 3D radar. It is a medium range radar designed to be extremely modular and highly configurable to provide a cost-effective high-performance radar, capable of operating effectively in littoral zones and improving air-defence, anti-surface (anti-ship) and air traffic management capabilities of the Type 23 frigates. Protection measures are also added to maintain detection ranges even when attacked by complex jammers. HMS Iron Duke is the first Type 23 frigate to have received the Type 997 Artisan 3D radar during her refit in 2012–13. It will be fitted to all T23's as well as the assault platforms (LPD) - HMS Albion & HMS Bulwark, the Helicopter Platform (LPH) - HMS Ocean and the two future Queen Elizabeth class aircraft carriers are also planned to be equipped with the same radar. The project was worth £100 Million and the contract was announced in 4 August 2008.

      HMS Iron Duke received her new Type 997 Artisan 3D radar in 2013. It is claimed the radar is 5 times more capable than the Type 996 radar it replaces.

      Common Anti-Air Modular Missile
      The CAMM(M) variant of the Common Anti-Air Modular Missile is intended to replace the current Sea Wolf missile currently equipped on the Type 23 frigates starting from 2016. CAMM(M) has a longer range of 1–25+ km compared to the 1–10 km offered by the Sea Wolf missile. An option exists to give the missile a surface-attack capability, though it is currently understood the Royal Navy will not take that option, due to budget reasons. Like Sea Wolf, CAMM(M) will be VLS launched, however due to its design, CAMM(M) can be packed much more tightly into the VLS, with up to four CAMM(M) fitting into the space occupied by one Sea Wolf missile. CAMM(M) is known as Sea Ceptor in Royal Navy service.


      Ships of the class
      On 21 July 2004, in the Delivering Security in a Changing World review of defence spending, Defence Secretary Geoff Hoon announced that HMS Norfolk, Marlborough and Grafton were to be paid off. In 2005 it was announced that these three vessels would be sold to the Chilean Navy and to be delivered in 2008. In September 2005 BAE Systems was awarded a £134 million GBP contract to prepare the frigates for transfer. The Marlborough, Norfolk and Grafton were sold to Chile for a total of £134 million. The letter of intent for purchase was signed in December 2004, followed by a formal contract on 7 September 2005. The Norfolk was handed over by the Defence Logistics Organisation and BAE Systems and commissioned into the Chilean Navy on 22 November 2006, and named Almirante Cochrane (FF-05) (after Lord Cochrane, a naval hero to both the British and Chileans). The Grafton was delivered to Chilean Navy on 28 March 2007 at Portsmouth and renamed Almirante Lynch (FF-07). The Marlborough was delivered to Chilean Navy on 28 May 2008 at Portsmouth and renamed Almirante Condell (FF-06).

      1. HMS Norfolk (F230) Commissioned 1990 (Later sold to Chile, Recommissioned 2006 as 'Almirante Cochrane' (FF05))
      2. HMS Marlborough (F233) Commissioned 1991 (Later sold to Chile, Recommissioned 2008 as 'Almirante Condell' (FF06))
      3. HMS Argyll (F231) Commissioned 1991
      4. HMS Lancaster (F229) Commissioned 1992 (originally with pennant number F232)
      5. HMS Iron Duke (F234) Commissioned 1993
      6. HMS Monmouth (F235) Commissioned 1993
      7. HMS Montrose (F236) Commissioned 1994
      8. HMS Westminster (F237) Commissioned 1994
      9. HMS Northumberland (F238) Commissioned 1994
      10. HMS Richmond (F239) Commissioned 1995
      11. HMS Somerset (F82) Commissioned 1996
      12. HMS Grafton (F80) Commissioned 1997 (Later Sold to Chile, Recommissioned 2007 as 'Almirante Lynch' (FF07))
      13. HMS Sutherland (F81) Commissioned 1997
      14. HMS Kent (F78) Commissioned 2000
      15. HMS Portland (F79) Commissioned 2001
      16. HMS St Albans (F83) Commissioned 2002


      Displacement: 4,900 t (4,800 long tons 5,400 short tons)
      Length: 133 m (436 ft 4 in)
      Beam: 16.1 m (52 ft 10 in)
      Draught: 7.3 m (23 ft 9 in)
      Propulsion: CODLAG:
      Four 1510 kW (2,025 shp) Paxman Valenta 12CM diesel generators
      Two GEC electric motors delivering 2980kW (4000 shp)
      Two Rolls-Royce Spey SM1C delivering 23,190 kW (31,100 shp)
      Speed: In excess of 28 kn (52 km/h 32 mph) (HMS Sutherland achieved 34.4 knots during high-speed trials in November of 2008)
      Range: 7,500 nautical miles (14,000 km) at 15 kn (28 km/h)
      Crew Complement: 185 (accommodation for up to 205)
      Electronic warfare
      and decoys:
      UAF-1 ESM, or, UAT Mod 1
      Seagnat
      Type 182 towed torpedo decoy
      Surface Ship Torpedo Defence
      Armament:
      Anti-air missiles:
      1 × 32-cell Sea Wolf GWS.26 VLS canisters for 32:
      Sea Wolf missiles (range 1-10 km)
      Anti-ship missiles:
      2 × quad Harpoon launchers
      Anti-submarine torpedoes:
      2 × Twin 12.75 in (324 mm) Sting Ray torpedo tubes
      Guns:
      1 × BAE 4.5 inch Mk 8 naval gun
      2 × 30mm DS30M Mk2 guns, or, 2× 30mm DS30B guns
      2 × Miniguns
      4 × General purpose machine guns
      Aircraft carried: 1 × Lynx HMA8, armed with
      4 × Sea Skua anti ship missiles, or
      2 × anti submarine torpedoes
      or
      1 × Westland Merlin HM1, armed with
      4 × anti submarine torpedoes
      Aviation facilities:
      Flight deck
      Enclosed hangar


      UK Defence Forum

      Gabriele Senior Member Posts: 2000 Joined: 30 Apr 2015, 18:53 Location: Contact:

      Re: Type 23 Frigate (Duke Class) (RN)

      Post by Gabriele » 06 Aug 2015, 14:27

      You might also know me as Liger30, from that great forum than MP.net was.

      Arma Pacis Fulcra.
      Si Vis Pacem, Para Bellum

      Re: Type 23 Frigate (Duke Class) (RN)

      Post by jonas » 06 Aug 2015, 15:47

      Are you suggesting that they are being sensible ?

      Gabriele Senior Member Posts: 2000 Joined: 30 Apr 2015, 18:53 Location: Contact:

      Re: Type 23 Frigate (Duke Class) (RN)

      Post by Gabriele » 06 Aug 2015, 21:29

      Are you suggesting that they are being sensible ?

      Well, it is the only explanation that makes sense, unless the RN already knows it will have to withdraw one Type 23 in the SDSR. I hope it is not the second.

      By the way, it really, really would be awesome to have a little bit of detail from the MOD about how the transition from 23 to 26 is planned to play out, considering that quite a lot of bits of kit is supposed to move from old to new vessels. Meaning, by the way, that the routine availability of frigates will drop indeed to 12, because if stuff is confirmed moving from 23 to 26, it is obvious that the 23 will have to be stripped well before the new 26 takes her place.

      HMS Argyll, according to the 2008 OSD list, is the first Type 23 due to go out of service. But she seems to be getting an extensive CSP, including CAMM. It makes me think that Argyll could no longer be the first to go. Considering that the swap from Sea Wolf to CAMM is never going to be complete by 2023, and indeed even the fitting of the new gensets will only be completed by 2024, i would think that the first Type 23 to bow out would do so without receiving the new gensets, CAMM and other bits. Wouldn't make sense to hurry upgrading a ship only to strip a few years later, while ships expected to serve for a longer time get refitted only later on, no.

      Would be nice if common sense was being used, for once.

      You might also know me as Liger30, from that great forum than MP.net was.

      Arma Pacis Fulcra.
      Si Vis Pacem, Para Bellum

      Re: Type 23 Frigate (Duke Class) (RN)

      Post by rec » 10 Aug 2015, 15:33

      Gabriele Senior Member Posts: 2000 Joined: 30 Apr 2015, 18:53 Location: Contact:

      Re: Type 23 Frigate (Duke Class) (RN)

      Post by Gabriele » 10 Aug 2015, 15:45

      The new gensets will take out to 2024 to be installed on 12 Type 23s during technical stops. And the first Type 23 is planned to be gone in 2023. It will go without receiving the new gensets. It is that simple, for once.

      You might also know me as Liger30, from that great forum than MP.net was.

      Arma Pacis Fulcra.
      Si Vis Pacem, Para Bellum

      Re: Type 23 Frigate (Duke Class) (RN)

      Post by -Eddie- » 10 Aug 2015, 16:47

      marktigger Senior Member Posts: 4621 Joined: 01 May 2015, 10:22 Location:

      Re: Type 23 Frigate (Duke Class) (RN)

      Post by marktigger » 10 Aug 2015, 17:19

      RichardIC Senior Member Posts: 1100 Joined: 10 May 2015, 16:59 Location:

      Re: Type 23 Frigate (Duke Class) (RN)

      Post by RichardIC » 10 Aug 2015, 17:43

      by marktigger » 10 Aug 2015, 17:19

      wonder will one of the later refits have trial fit for the 5in gun

      Why? Mod 4 will have been in service for over two decades by the time the first T26 enters service.

      Gabriele Senior Member Posts: 2000 Joined: 30 Apr 2015, 18:53 Location: Contact:

      Re: Type 23 Frigate (Duke Class) (RN)

      Post by Gabriele » 10 Aug 2015, 18:11

      Don't think it'll have any real effect on speed. The extra power (and it is not too terribly much, we are talking of an additional 560 kw in total over the four gensets) will be more likely swallowed by electronics, climatization and other ship needs.

      You might also know me as Liger30, from that great forum than MP.net was.

      Arma Pacis Fulcra.
      Si Vis Pacem, Para Bellum

      marktigger Senior Member Posts: 4621 Joined: 01 May 2015, 10:22 Location:

      Re: Type 23 Frigate (Duke Class) (RN)

      Post by marktigger » 10 Aug 2015, 20:17

      by marktigger » 10 Aug 2015, 17:19

      wonder will one of the later refits have trial fit for the 5in gun

      Why? Mod 4 will have been in service for over two decades by the time the first T26 enters service.

      Re: Type 23 Frigate (Duke Class) (RN)

      Post by GibMariner » 17 Sep 2015, 10:24

      shark bait Senior Member Posts: 6107 Joined: 05 May 2015, 21:18 Location:

      Re: Type 23 Frigate (Duke Class) (RN)

      Post by shark bait » 17 Sep 2015, 11:24

      Re: Type 23 Frigate (Duke Class) (RN)

      Post by GibMariner » 17 Sep 2015, 11:48

      It truly quite a remarkable facility. One thing I've been wondering is whether the future Type 26 ships will be able to have their refits done there?

      I can't remember right now, but I think the facility was modified to accommodate the Type 22 Batch II & III - the quoted length for the T26 is 148 m, same as the Batch III T22, if this is the case then I would imagine so.

      On that note, has the length of the Type 26 been limited by this factor?

      marktigger Senior Member Posts: 4621 Joined: 01 May 2015, 10:22 Location:

      Re: Type 23 Frigate (Duke Class) (RN)

      Post by marktigger » 17 Sep 2015, 11:58

      marktigger Senior Member Posts: 4621 Joined: 01 May 2015, 10:22 Location:

      Re: Type 23 Frigate (Duke Class) (RN)

      Post by marktigger » 17 Sep 2015, 11:59

      It truly quite a remarkable facility. One thing I've been wondering is whether the future Type 26 ships will be able to have their refits done there?

      I can't remember right now, but I think the facility was modified to accommodate the Type 22 Batch II & III - the quoted length for the T26 is 148 m, same as the Batch III T22, if this is the case then I would imagine so.

      On that note, has the length of the Type 26 been limited by this factor?

      whats the planned beam on them and their over all height that might be a limiting factor can't see a Type 45 fitting inside because of the height

      Re: Type 23 Frigate (Duke Class) (RN)

      Post by GibMariner » 17 Sep 2015, 12:46

      It truly quite a remarkable facility. One thing I've been wondering is whether the future Type 26 ships will be able to have their refits done there?

      I can't remember right now, but I think the facility was modified to accommodate the Type 22 Batch II & III - the quoted length for the T26 is 148 m, same as the Batch III T22, if this is the case then I would imagine so.

      On that note, has the length of the Type 26 been limited by this factor?

      whats the planned beam on them and their over all height that might be a limiting factor can't see a Type 45 fitting inside because of the height

      No idea about T26 total height, but I believe beam was stated to be 20 metres (Type 23 beam = 16m).

      However, I distinctly remember reading somewhere that the Batch I T22 were limited to a length of around 130 m due to the length of the frigate refit complex at Devonport - which was subsequently lengthened for the Batch III.

      Re: Type 23 Frigate (Duke Class) (RN)

      Post by GibMariner » 18 Sep 2015, 14:24

      Royal Navy frigate HMS Monmouth has marked the end of a 20 month refit following a successful Fleet Date Inspection in Her Majesty’s Naval Base Devonport on Friday 18 September 15.

      HMS Monmouth, known informally as ‘The Black Duke’ after James Scott, the Duke of Monmouth, has recently returned to Devonport following extensive sea trials where Her array of upgraded weapon systems and sensors were fully proven and made ready for operational use.

      Re: Type 23 Frigate (Duke Class) (RN)

      Post by jonas » 19 Sep 2015, 09:22

      All go for Sea Ceptor [DSEi15D4]
      Richard Scott
      18 September 2015

      MBDA has begun delivering hardware for the first Sea Ceptor local anti-air missile system installation after the Royal Navy approved a ‘commit to fitting’ for the Type 23 frigate HMS Argyll.

      Meanwhile, the company has begun a campaign of final qualification firings at the Vidsel range in Sweden of the Common Anti-air Module Munition (CAMM) effector associated with the system.

      ‘‘In May this year I made the decision, with the Ministry of Defence, to commit to the fitting of Sea Ceptor on HMS Argyll,’’ Rear Admiral Alex Burton, assistant chief of the Naval Staff (Ships), told the DSEI Daily during a briefing on board HMS Iron Duke. ‘‘This is a key acknowledgement of the confidence we have in Sea Ceptor to replace the current [GWS 26 Mod 1] Seawolf system. Sea Ceptor provides a significantly improved capability [over Seawolf] and massively reduced whole-life costs.’’ MBDA confirmed that it made a first hardware delivery to Devonport − where Argyll is being refitted − in August this year. A second shipment will follow at the end of 2015.

      The replacement of GWS 26 Mod 1 with Sea Ceptor forms one strand of a wider Capability Sustainment Programme being rolled out for the Type 23s.

      Other aspects include the introduction of the Type 997 E/F-band 3D medium-range radar, which will provide target indication support to the Sea Ceptor system.

      To minimise ship impact, Sea Ceptor installation on the Type 23s has been engineered to use existing GWS 26 Mod 1 infrastructure and interface points. CAMM missiles will be fitted in the existing VL Seawolf silo (one canister per cell for a maximum of 32 missiles).

      The Type 23 Sea Ceptor fit will use two Platform Data Link Terminal (PDLT) equipments, one fore and one aft, to ensure uninterrupted 360° coverage. The PDLT provides for two-way communications between the ship and the CAMM missile target positional updates can be uplinked from the ship to the missile in-flight, while missile status information and diagnostics can be sent back to the ship.


      F 237 HMS Westminster

      Westminster was used for the interior shots in the 1997 James Bond film Tomorrow Never Dies in three different roles - as HMS Chester, HMS Devonshire and HMS Bedford. For the exterior shots a model was constructed.


      Operational history:

      In 2004, Westminster was assigned one of the Royal Navy's first Merlin helicopters. Also in 2004, the ship was the first to be fitted with the new low-frequency Sonar 2087 designed to detect the most advanced submarines. The technology is controversial as its effects on marine wildlife remain unclear.

      In December 2005, the ship's company of Westminster were all granted Freedom of the City of Westminster. 200 naval officers and sailors in full ceremonial uniform paraded through the streets of London from Westminster Abbey to Horse Guards as part of the celebration service. Westminster was chosen as a very rare recognition of her contributions to Westminster schools, local charities and the community as a whole. The honour entitles the crew the freedom to "parade through the City on all ceremonial occasions in full panoply and with drums beating, colours flying and bayonets fixed".

      She was deployed to Burma in May 2008 to spearhead the British relief effort after Cyclone Nargis devastated the country, but later had to withdraw after the junta refused to grant permission for aid to be landed.

      In March 2011, Westminster took part in Operation Ellamy, the British role in the coalition action during the 2011 Libyan civil war by enforcing a naval blockade. She took part in Exercise Saxon Warrior in the Western Approaches with the US aircraft carrier George H.W. Bush in May 2011, culminating in a so-called 'Thursday War'.

      On 23 January 2012, Westminster departed Portsmouth to reinforce the British guided-missile destroyer Daring that was also underway for the Persian Gulf to relieve the frigate Argyll.

      Whilst in the Persian Gulf she made a port call in Dubai where one of her sailors (Leading Seaman Timothy Andrew MacColl, 27, from Gosport in Hampshire.) disappeared, prompting a bilateral search between the Royal Navy and local authorities. He was declared dead by the Royal Navy in May 2014.

      In early 2013, she was part of the multi-national Exercise Joint Warrior, practising amphibious operations off the coast of Scotland. In September she was part of the COUGAR 13 task group, for a series of joint exercises in the Mediterranean and Persian Gulf. She visited Gibraltar on the way to the Middle East. This came amidst growing tensions between Spain and Britain over the status of Gibraltar however the British Government described the visit as 'routine'. In September 2013, she practised anti-submarine drills with the Italian Navy's Sauro-class submarine Salvatore Pelosi and the Durand de la Penne-class destroyer Francesco Mimbelli. In the Gulf of Oman, Westminster conducted anti-submarine drills against USS Dallas. In October 2013, she exercised with the Indian Navy off Goa.

      On Sunday, 28 September 2014, she docked at East India Dock, by Canary Wharf, in London.


      F 235 HMS Monmouth

      Affectionately known as 'The Black Duke', Monmouth is the only ship in service with the Royal Navy that has its name painted in black and flies a plain black flag in addition to the ensign. This is due to the dissolution of the title and the blacking out of the Coat of Arms of the Duke of Monmouth in 1685 following the Monmouth Rebellion against James II of England.


      Operational history:

      Monmouth visited Wellington in June 1995 in company with RFA Brambleleaf, the first UK or US warship to visit New Zealand since the 1985 ANZUS dispute. Another "first" followed in 1999 as Monmouth became the first major Royal Navy vessel to visit Dublin since the 1960s.

      In early 2004 the ship was assigned to the Atlantic Patrol Task North. In 2006 Monmouth underwent operational sea training, conducted by Flag Officer Sea Training, in which she spent six weeks fighting off staged attacks by ships and submarines.

      Monmouth returned to berth at her home port HMNB Devonport on 3 December 2007 having completed a circumnavigation of the globe, visiting Australia, New Zealand, and Hawaii and taking part in a FPDA Exercise.

      In 2008 she went into refit and in 2009 deployed to the Gulf, returning in April 2010.

      On 27 May 2010, she escorted the fleet of "little ships" commemorating the 70th anniversary of Operation Dynamo, the evacuation from Dunkirk on 27 May-4 June 1940 of approximately 340,000 British and French soldiers, and one of the most celebrated military events in British history.

      Monmouth spent June 2011 in the Indian Ocean patrolling the waters off Somalia as part of the ongoing multi-national anti-piracy operations in the region. The deployment also saw her spend some time in Victoria, the capital of the Seychelles where she took part in the islands' Independence celebrations.

      In February 2012, Monmouth began a six week refit period at Devonport's frigate shed, following on from a seven month deployment in the Indian Ocean which began in 2011. For the refit, the ship was taken out of the water into an enclosed dry-dock.

      In May 2013, she returned to her home port after a seven month mission to the Gulf. Monmouth also hosted an International Principle Warfare Officer's course in 2013. She is due to participate in exercise Joint Warrior 2013. From October 2013 she is in home waters serving as the Fleet Ready Escort.

      In February 2016, she participated in NATO exercise Dynamic Guard.

      He served in the Second Anglo-Dutch War and commanded English troops taking part in the Third Anglo-Dutch War before commanding the Anglo-Dutch brigade fighting in the Franco-Dutch War.


      F 83 HMS St. Albans

      The ship was launched on the River Clyde on Saturday 6 May 2000. She was built at BAE Systems' Yarrows Yard in Scotstoun, Glasgow.

      On 27 October 2002, before she had even entered operational service, St Albans was struck by the P&O ferry Pride of Portsmouth when gale force winds pushed the ferry into the ship whilst secure on her berth in Portsmouth. St Albans suffered damage to the gun deck, the sea boat supports (davits) and the bridge wing. However, no members of the crew were injured.

      In 2004, Commander Steve Dainton RN took command and the ship was deployed on Operation Oracle duties in the Arabian Sea.

      In July 2004 the crew were granted Freedom of the City by the Mayor of St Albans.

      On 13 February 2006, St Albans departed on a six-month deployment to the Gulf region. She arrived in the region in early April, where her tasks included protecting Iraqi oil platforms as well as patrol duties in the northern Gulf. During the trip, she provided a diplomatic role by visiting 16 countries, including Algeria, Albania, Ukraine, Romania, Bulgaria, Turkey and Lebanon (before the 2006 conflict with Israel).


      Evacuation of British citizens from Lebanon:

      As of 12 July 2006, the ship had completed her tour in the Gulf and had begun her long journey back to Portsmouth. However, on the same day, the conflict between Israel and Lebanon began. As a result, it was announced on Monday 17 July by The Ministry of Defence that St Albans, which was on a route that would take it through the eastern Mediterranean (via the Suez canal), had been redeployed to assist in the evacuation of British citizens trapped in Lebanon (Operation Highbrow). She arrived in the area on Thursday 20 July and on Friday 21 July she picked up 243 evacuees from the dock in Beirut and safely transported them to Cyprus. After completing her role in the evacuation, she remained on operational stand-by in the vicinity of Beirut for a short time before being ordered to return home, their original aim. The ship finally arrived back in Portsmouth on 18 August 2006.


      After the tour:

      Following the ship's successful 6-month tour, St Albans underwent maintenance. During this time, the ship received a new commanding officer, Commander Mark Newland RN. He took over from Commander Steve Dainton RN, commanding officer for the previous two years. The ship stayed in British waters, participated in submarine training in the Irish Sea, weapon training off the south coast and visited Glasgow on 11 November 2006 to take part in Remembrance Sunday events. From 5 January until 15 January 2007 the ship was open to the public as part of the London Boat Show. Following this, the ship conducted various training exercises and engineering trials in the UK. The ship's crew then went on Easter leave before returning to conduct more training activities.


      Maintenance:

      In May 2007, St Albans entered a period of maintenance that lasted over a year. The maintenance programme took place in dry dock, situated in Rosyth. Many systems were overhauled and replaced and the ship's crew temporarily reassigned to other vessels while the ship underwent work. A skeleton crew of engineers supervised the work for the year. Included in the maintenance was the installation of a new Type 2087 sonar system and a conversion to allow the operation of Merlin helicopters, making the ship one of the Fleet’s most advanced frigates.

      The upgrade took 15 months and cost £15 million. The ship then returned to its home port of Portsmouth and was accepted back into the fleet in July 2008. The ship was then put through various equipment tests & training routines throughout the later part of the year.

      St Albans left Portsmouth on 19 January 2009 to conduct maritime security patrols in the Mediterranean. The ship joined a NATO Task Group in the Mediterranean and will be protecting busy shipping trade routes. St Albans was also a part of the NATO Response Force (NRF), capable of being deployed anywhere that NATO decides at short notice. The ship also visited ports in Majorca, Italy and Egypt whilst in the region. She arrived on the Clyde on 7 May 2009 at 1500hrs, heading for Faslane.

      St Albans was deployed in the Gulf until mid-2010. She left Portsmouth on 1000hrs on Monday 1 February. Her deployment included supporting international efforts in "tackling piracy, illegal trafficking, and smuggling."

      Later in the deployment St Albans helped the Iraqi government "protect their oil platforms, and provide security to ensure regional stability".

      In July 2010 after completing her tour in the Middle East, she visited Grand Harbour, Malta for four days on her way back to the United Kingdom.

      The warship helped in the recovery of a diver who had got into difficulties near Salcombe on 26 March 2011, although the diver was pronounced dead on arrival at hospital.

      On 1 July 2011, St Albans rescued 13 sailors of the coast of Oman from the stricken tanker MV Pavit, which had spent three days drifting in a heavy storm after losing power. St Albans used her Merlin helicopter embarked from 829 Naval Air Squadron to winch the crew to safety. The rescued sailors were later transferred to their sister ship, the MV Jag Pushpa. After operating in the Middle East conducting counter-terrorism and anti-piracy operations, having relieved the frigate HMS Iron Duke, she returned to Portsmouth, via Malta and Lisbon, in December 2011.

      The Worshipful Company of Marketors became affiliated to HMS St Albans in 2011.

      In March 2012, HMS St Albans visited the Pool of London where she entertained a number of her affiliate organisations and other guests before returning to her home port of Portsmouth to conduct exercises in the Western Approaches. In May, she visited Iceland, where the captain Cdr Tom Sharpe and Britain’s Ambassador to Iceland Ian Whitting cast a wreath into Hvalfjördur – once a vital staging point for the Arctic Convoys to the Soviet Union. Over 1½ million people saw the ship's return to Portsmouth as part of world’s largest harbour festival. The frigate sailed up the Elbe to Hamburg to take part in the port's 823rd birthday celebrations. In June, St Albans visited the home of the German Navy in Kiel, joining in the huge maritime event attended by 50 countries, 2000 yachts and pleasure craft and more than 5,000 yachtsmen and women. Before joining in the celebrations, members of the ship’s company including Commanding Officer Commander Tom Sharpe OBE RN, two platoons and the ship’s guard headed to a remembrance service and wreath laying at the Commonwealth Cemetery at Nordfriedhof.

      Under her new commanding officer, Commander Andrew Block RN, HMS St Albans continued her home duties visiting the Channel Islands and Holyhead with an extended tour visiting Stavanger, Oslo and Amsterdam. During this deployment she was the last ship to fire the Royal Navy's 4.5" Mk.8 Mod 0 gun off Stavanger. In May 2013 she was handed over to BAe Systems for her refit in Portsmouth Harbour, her home port, silently coached into C lock. She will remain in dock until Spring 2014 to be modernised for another 10 years.

      In December 2013, Commander Catherine Jordan RN, one of the few female Commanding Officers in the Royal Navy, took command of the ship.

      A new crew has been assembled and the ship finished her £25million refit to schedule in the Spring followed by a period of intense trials and will rejoin the fleet in Summer 2014.

      Since May 2014 HMS St Albans has been on extended trails developing her military capability and testing her systems integration. She is now fitted with the Artisan 3D radar, the all electric 'Kryten'4.5" Mod1 gun, mid-life upgrade to her Sea Wolf missile system together with a wide range of more detailed improvements. During the trails HMS St Albans visited Plymouth and Falmouth. Her Rededication Ceremony was on Friday 1 August 2014.

      On Monday 3 November 2014 HMS St Albans passed her Material Assessment and Safety Check.

      In December 2014 HMS St Albans visited London mooring alongside HMS Belfast in the Pool of London and then sailed across the North Sea and down the Nieuwe Maas to visit Rotterdam.

      Still based in Portsmouth she continued trials in the Western English Channel and then visited Trondheim in Norway and continued live firing trials.

      After completing her extensive FOST trails, based at Plymouth, she entered West India Dock, London on 7 July 2015 and then sailed back to Portsmouth arriving 16 July 2015 ready to be the Guard Ship for the Portsmouth America's Cup races later in the month.

      St Albans sailed for a nine-month mission to the Middle East on 27 November 2015, carrying a Merlin HM2 and ScanEagle UAV.

      In transiting the Mediterranean she was involved with the seizure of 320 kg of cocaine work more than £1 million on the street. On 11 January 2016, Defence Secretary Michael Fallon announced that "HMS St Albans will shortly join the Charles de Gaulle aircraft carrier group" as part of operations against the Islamic State group.

      The subsidiary titles of the Duke are: Earl of Burford, in the County of Oxford (1676), Baron Heddington, in the County of Oxford (1676) and Baron Vere, of Hanworth in the County of Middlesex (1750). The Earldom and the Barony of Heddington are in the Peerage of England, and the Barony of Vere is in the Peerage of Great Britain. The Dukes of St Albans also bear the hereditary title of Grand Falconer of England, and Hereditary Registrar of the Court of Chancery.

      The eldest son and heir of the Duke of St Albans is known by the courtesy title Earl of Burford, and Lord Burford's eldest son and heir is known as Lord Vere.


      F 81 HMS Sutherland

      She was launched in 1996 by Lady Christina Walmsley, wife of Sir Robert Walmsley KCB. Before this occasion, Royal Navy ships had always been launched with a bottle of champagne, but Lady Walmsley broke with tradition and used a bottle of Macallan Scotch whisky.


      Operational history:

      She was deployed to the Falkland Islands in the winter 1998/1999. In 2000, she was part of the task force NTG2000, the first time Royal Navy ships have circumnavigated the globe since 1986. In December 2007, major upgrades worth £35 million were announced making Sutherland the "most powerful frigate in the fleet". The upgrades included Sonar 2087, an upgrade to Seawolf, an improvement to the 4.5 inch gun to allow it to fire long-range ammunition, and a reshaped stern to cut fuel use.

      After berthing in Invergordon, HMS Sutherland was granted the freedom of the county of Sutherland at a ceremony in Dornoch on 18 September 2004. A subsequent visit to Invergordon in March 2011 was cut short, with "operational commitments" as the given reason. This was eventually revealed as her deployment as part of the UK Response Force Task Group's (RFTG) first deployment, named COUGAR' 11. She returned to Invergordon in April 2013.

      In May 2011, she made a port visit to Patras, Greece following participation in exercises off Crete, after which she became involved in the operations off the Libyan coast.

      On 16 June 2011, Sutherland visited Souda Bay in Crete to commemorate the 70th anniversary of the Battle of Crete, before sailing to Kalamata in Greece to conduct further World War II memorials.

      On 24 July 2011 HMS Sutherland returned to the coast of Libya as part of Operation Ellamy.

      On 18 October 2011 HMS Sutherland passed through Tower Bridge in London and docked next to HMS Belfast, returning through the bridge on 22 October 2011.


      F 236 HMS Montrose


      HMS Montrose (F 236) firing a RGM-84 Harpoon SSM

      Having once been the flagship of the 6th Frigate Squadron, Montrose is now part of the Devonport Flotilla, based in Devonport Dockyard in Plymouth.


      Operational history:


      Service in 1990s and early 2000s:

      Deployments in the 1990s include her first trip to the South Atlantic, as Falkland Islands Guardship, which ended in October 1996. Her first visit to the City of Dundee was in 1993. Several NATO deployments followed, and in early 2002, Montrose returned to the Falklands on the now-renamed Atlantic Patrol Task (South) deployment, during which divers from Montrose replaced the White Ensign on Antelope, which was sunk during the Falklands War. On her return from this deployment, she conducted her first refit period (RP1), which was completed in early January 2004.


      2004 Chicoutimi Incident:

      In October 2004, Montrose was one of a number of ships that was dispatched to the rescue of the stricken Canadian submarine Chicoutimi (an ex-Royal Navy Upholder-class submarine) which had suffered a number of fires on board, causing casualties and the loss of power in the submarine. Montrose was the first Royal Navy vessel to make contact with the boat and assisted the submarine.


      Service in late 2000s:

      Montrose deployed in 2006 to the Persian Gulf on Operation Telic in the first half of 2006. After returning to the UK for personnel changes and maintenance, from 8 January to 27 July 2007, Montrose then deployed for seven months to the Mediterranean Sea as the UK contribution to the Standing NATO Maritime Group Two (SNMG2). As part of this group, she participated in NATO’s Operation Active Endeavour (OAE), countering terrorist activity in the Mediterranean and preventing smuggling and other illegal activity. After Summer Leave, the ship headed to Scotland to take part in Exercise Neptune Warrior, during which time she was visited by Prince Michael of Kent, Honorary Rear Admiral of the Royal Naval Reserve, on 24 September 2007.

      Following Operational Sea Training, Montrose deployed again to the Middle East on 12 March 2008 to join Combined Task Force (CTF) 150, operating in the Gulf of Aden and the Arabian Sea. Activity in this deployment included Exercise KhunjarHaad, a multi-national exercise held in the Gulf of Oman, and (working with Chatham, Edinburgh and RFA Argus the seizure of over 23 tonnes of drugs including cocaine, hashish, amphetamines and opiates. She returned home on 3 October 2008, and after operating in UK waters, commenced a £15,000,000 upkeep package at Rosyth in early 2009.

      This second refit package (RP2) included a number of major capability upgrades for the ship, including the first fitting of the Royal Navy’s newest command system, DNA(2), and the replacement of the two old manually-operated 30mm guns with two 30mm DS30M Mark 2 Guns. Having rejoined the ship on 20 July 2009, the Ship's Company conducted post-refits trials until January 2010, and Montrose was formally accepted back into the Fleet on 11 February 2010.


      Service in 2010s:

      After operational sea training Montrose deployed to Arabian Sea in Summer 2010 to conduct anti-piracy operations, highlights of which included the November 2010 destruction of a Somalian pirate ship by the ships Lynx helicopter while on patrol off the coast of Somalia and the disruption of several pirate attacks on merchant ships.

      In October 2011, Montrose deployed again to the South Atlantic, during which she was due to visit Callao, Peru in March 2012, but the Peruvian government cancelled the visit, according to the Foreign Minister, as a gesture of solidarity with Argentina over the Falklands. After visits to New Orleans and Bermuda in March and April 2012, Montrose returned to the UK in May 2012. In July 2012, the ship acted as the escort vessel for HM the Queen during her Diamond Jubilee visit to Cowes.

      From September to November 2012, the ship participated in the COUGAR 12 deployment to the Mediterranean. In early 2013, the ship and crew underwent intensive training to return to the front line, and then deployed as part of the COUGAR 13 task group in August 2013. After the remainder of the COUGAR 13 task group returned to the UK, Montrose remained in the Middle East to act as the UK's frigate in the Persian Gulf under Operation KIPION, and conducted numerous exercises with allied nations, as well as UK-only training events such as the maintenance exercise with RFA Diligence.

      In 2014, Montrose was tasked to join Norwegian and Danish warships in Operation RECSYR - the mission to escort the merchant vessels removing the Syrian chemical weapons stockpile for destruction. Having handed over to HMS Diamond, the ship arrived home in March 2014. Subsequently, and after a high profile London visit to celebrate 20 years since the ship's commissioning, the ship was sent to the Baltic Sea to participate in BALTOPS 14, a large scale US-led multinational exercise with participation from 30 ships and submarines from 14 nations. The ship entered refit at Devonport in October 2014, and will rejoin the Fleet in 2016.


      Visits to Dundee and Montrose:

      Montrose has visited the city of Dundee on many occasions, include Easter 1997, 6-9 November 1998 (Dundee Navy Days), 9 October 2004 (for wreath-laying ceremony commemorating the 200th anniversary of the death of Admiral Adam Duncan), 4 June 2005, and 9-13 November 2006 (covering the Remembrance Sunday memorial service).

      The port of Montrose is smaller than Dundee, but Montrose has been able to call in four times in her history. The first visit took place in November 1999, and has only happened three times subsequently, once in July 2002, when the ship was granted the Freedom of Angus by the Provost Mrs Frances Duncan, and marched through the town, and 6 years later in November 2008, when the-then Angus Provost Ruth Melville took the salute during a Remembrance Sunday parade in which this Freedom was exercised. The ship returned to Montrose in July 2014, where they exercised the Freedom of Angus in front of Provost Helen Oswald, as well as conducting numerous engagements in the local area.

      The title was bestowed anew in 1707, again in the peerage of Scotland, on the fourth Marquess of Montrose, and has since been in the Graham family. The title is also tied as the chieftainship of Clan Graham.

      The Duke's subsidiary titles are: Marquess of Montrose (created 1644), Marquess of Graham and Buchanan (1707), Earl of Montrose (1503), Earl of Kincardine (1644 & 1707), Earl Graham of Belford (1722), Viscount Dundaff (1707), Lord Graham (1445), Lord Aberruthven, Mugdock and Fintrie (1707) and Baron Graham of Belford (1722). The titles Earl and Baron Graham of Belford are in the peerage of Great Britain the rest are in the peerage of Scotland. The eldest son of the Duke uses the courtesy title Marquess of Graham and Buchanan.


      Watch the video: Type 23 Frigate Or Duke Class Frigates Royal Navy Warship