Aircraft Squadron Disappears in the Bermuda Triangle

Aircraft Squadron Disappears in the Bermuda Triangle


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At 2:10 p.m., five U.S. Lauderdale Naval Air Station in Florida on a routine three-hour training mission. Flight 19 was scheduled to take them due east for 120 miles, north for 73 miles, and then back over a final 120-mile leg that would return them to the naval base. They never returned.

Two hours after the flight began, the leader of the squadron, who had been flying in the area for more than six months, reported that his compass and back-up compass had failed and that his position was unknown. The other planes experienced similar instrument malfunctions. Radio facilities on land were contacted to find the location of the lost squadron, but none were successful. After two more hours of confused messages from the fliers, a distorted radio transmission from the squadron leader was heard at 6:20 p.m., apparently calling for his men to prepare to ditch their aircraft simultaneously because of lack of fuel.

READ MORE: Bermuda Triangle Mystery: What Happened to the USS Cyclops?

By this time, several land radar stations finally determined that Flight 19 was somewhere north of the Bahamas and east of the Florida coast, and at 7:27 p.m. a search and rescue Mariner aircraft took off with a 13-man crew. Three minutes later, the Mariner aircraft radioed to its home base that its mission was underway. The Mariner was never heard from again. Later, there was a report from a tanker cruising off the coast of Florida of a visible explosion seen at 7:50 p.m.

The disappearance of the 14 men of Flight 19 and the 13 men of the Mariner led to one of the largest air and seas searches to that date, and hundreds of ships and aircraft combed thousands of square miles of the Atlantic Ocean, the Gulf of Mexico, and remote locations within the interior of Florida. No trace of the bodies or aircraft was ever found.

Although naval officials maintained that the remains of the six aircraft and 27 men were not found because stormy weather destroyed the evidence, the story of the “Lost Squadron” helped cement the legend of the Bermuda Triangle, an area of the Atlantic Ocean where ships and aircraft are said to disappear without a trace. The Bermuda Triangle is said to stretch from the southern U.S. coast across to Bermuda and down to the Atlantic coast of Cuba and Santo Domingo.

READ MORE: What is the Bermuda Triangle?


Aircraft Squadron Disappears in the Bermuda Triangle - HISTORY

Posted on 12/05/2015 7:43:36 AM PST by Kid Shelleen

At 2:10 p.m., five U.S. Navy Avenger torpedo-bombers comprising Flight 19 take off from the Ft. Lauderdale Naval Air Station in Florida on a routine three-hour training mission. Flight 19 was scheduled to take them due east for 120 miles, north for 73 miles, and then back over a final 120-mile leg that would return them to the naval base. They never returned.

Two hours after the flight began, the leader of the squadron, who had been flying in the area for more than six months, reported that his compass and back-up compass had failed and that his position was unknown. The other planes experienced similar instrument malfunctions. Radio facilities on land were contacted to find the location of the lost squadron, but none were successful. After two more hours of confused messages from the fliers, a distorted radio transmission from the squadron leader was heard at 6:20 p.m., apparently calling for his men to prepare to ditch their aircraft simultaneously because of lack of fuel.

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Well, this remains an unsolved mystery. What can you say, when experienced pilots all disappear, and experienced pilots on a rescue mission all disappear. What can you say when no trace of the men or aircraft was ever found.

IIRC, they found some of the planes a few years ago.

I think in the end they got lost and disoriented and instead of being east of Florida they were just south of it and the strategy of flying west expecting to hit land took them into the Gulf of Mexico where they ran out of gas. They ditched where no one was looking for them.


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The leader of the formation was new to the area. He had recently come from Miami and He had never flown that route in question even once. He had a reputation for seat of the pants navigation, and had become lost before to the point the navy had documented it. All of the clocks had been removed from the planes.
He tried an island to island VFR technique and became confused after mistaking a few landmarks. His craptastic navigation eventually convinced him he was over the Keys, so he turns northeast to try to get back to florida. This course took him deeper into the atlantic.
That’s per the navy report.
The navy doesn’t consider it a big mystery.
As for the others, they followed the flight leader just like when the thunderbirds all flew into the ground together.
They follow the flight lead.

My brother-in -law flew a single engine prop plane over the Bermuda Triangle for a couple of decades. He started with only a compass and radio direction finder (the same type of instruments at the start of WWII), but ended with loran. He never got lost.

If you look at the route, its simple. A student today could easily do it. 20 minutes out, left turn briefly, and a 20 minute return heading. Each turn with a visual checkpoint.
Easy peasy unless you don’t do the basics.
In fact, the simplicity of the run was what probably lured him into not doing it right.

He must have been using those sharks for landmarks. You know, the ones Al Sharpton say are still there from the slave routes.

Exactly. Early on, I bought into the "mystery" business - especially when all five disappeared at once, plus the flying boat sent out to search for them.

Then I read The Bermuda Triangle Mystery - Solved", which put everything into perspective. It was/is all sensationalist B/S.

Read the author's definitive book on "The Disappearance of Flight 19", which has the entire transcript of the messages between the flight and the control towers.

As others have posted, the went out, got lost, and flew until they ran out of gas. The money quote was when one pilot said he was running low, Taylor said that they'd all go down together. Then the Navy sent out 13 aircraft, not one. The plane that "disappeared" was a Martin Mariner, also known as "the flying gas tank" from all the fumes. A freighter reported seeing a ball of fire that evening, went to investigate, and found nothing.

As an aside, steer clear of anything Berlitz writes as he is somewhat "creative" (and that's being kind).

WWII Navy pilots were expert at ditching. All 5 planes would have survives that.

I have read the squadron leader was drunk when he took off.

They were flying over the Bahamas, he thought they were over the Florida keys and ordered everyone to fly North east over the ocean. When he ran out of fuel he ordered ALL the pilots to bail out.
The rescue plane was known as the Flying Gas Tank because of it’s many leaks and gasoline fumes in the cabin. it was surmised that a crew member “lit up” and blew up the plane. Someone on the beach noticed a sudden flare of light to the East at that moment.

***steer clear of anything Berlitz writes***

years ago, a Tabloid magazine had an article on the Bermuda Triangle by Berlitz in which he listed all the ships and planes that disappeared.
I decided to pinpoint each location. Of all those listed, only about four were actually in the Triangle. All the others were far away.
To show how UNBELIEVABLE the writings of Berlitz are, at that time he claimed that something mysterious reached out and drew the aircraft of Bo Rein from Louisiana into the Triangle.

“Following the 1979 season, Rein was hired away from NC State by Louisiana State University. In January 1980, Rein took a recruiting trip to Shreveport, Louisiana. On his January 10 return trip back to Baton Rouge, Louisiana, his private aircraft crashed leaving no survivors.[1]

Rein and experienced pilot Louis Benscotter, left Shreveport in a Cessna 441 aircraft. The flight was planned to be a 40-minute trip, but when Benscotter rerouted east to avoid a storm, air traffic control lost contact with him. The plane climbed to 40,000 feet and kept heading due east. After being tracked on radar, the plane was eventually intercepted by U.S. National Guard aircraft over North Carolina, a thousand miles off course and at an altitude of 41,600 feet, 6,600 feet higher than its maximum certified ceiling. The military pilots could not see anyone in the cockpit. The plane continued on over the Atlantic Ocean, where it crashed after running out of fuel. The military pilots spotted some debris, but no wreckage was ever recovered. The bodies of Rein and Benscotter have never been found.”

“I think in the end they got lost and disoriented and instead of being east of Florida they were just south of it and the strategy of flying west expecting to hit land took them into the Gulf of Mexico where they ran out of gas. They ditched where no one was looking for them.”

Oh pish posh. That’s ludicrous.

It was obviously a time warp that took them to the Lost Continent of Atlantis.

“Early on, I bought into the “mystery” business”

As a kid I wasted time, money and thought on such nonsense as well.

It has now become an even larger industry that spews utter mind poison that way too many Americans now take seriously.

Remember how Spielberg put this in his piece of garbage movie Close Encounters.

Think I read that one. I had just finished the "Solved" book and when I ran across Berlitz's fabrication of the compass problem, I threw the paper across the room. i.e. "Don't come after me. They look like they're from outer space". Quite a bit different from ""I know where I am now. I'm at 2,300 feet. Don't come after me."

Before that, I had suffered through "the sun doesn't look right", "the ocean looks strange", everything is white", ad vomitum. The "outer space" thingy was the last straw.

It’s not a mystery. The Bermuda Triangle was an invention of a grocery store circular. The rate of disappearances there are the same as any other similar sized similar trafficked body of water. Even experienced pilots make mistakes. And when things fall into the ocean they tend to never be seen again.

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Jersey Girl Today

On December 5, 1945

At 2:10 p.m., five U.S. Navy Avenger torpedo-bombers comprising Flight 19 take off from the Ft. Lauderdale Naval Air Station in Florida on a routine three-hour training mission. Flight 19 was scheduled to take them due east for 120 miles, north for 73 miles, and then back over a final 120-mile leg that would return them to the naval base. They never returned.

Two hours after the flight began, the leader of the squadron, who had been flying in the area for more than six months, reported that his compass and back-up compass had failed and that his position was unknown. The other planes experienced similar instrument malfunctions. Radio facilities on land were contacted to find the location of the lost squadron, but none were successful. After two more hours of confused messages from the fliers, a distorted radio transmission from the squadron leader was heard at 6:20 p.m., apparently calling for his men to prepare to ditch their aircraft simultaneously because of lack of fuel.

By this time, several land radar stations finally determined that Flight 19 was somewhere north of the Bahamas and east of the Florida coast, and at 7:27 p.m. a search and rescue Mariner aircraft took off with a 13-man crew. Three minutes later, the Mariner aircraft radioed to its home base that its mission was underway. The Mariner was never heard from again. Later, there was a report from a tanker cruising off the coast of Florida of a visible explosion seen at 7:50 p.m.

The disappearance of the 14 men of Flight 19 and the 13 men of the Mariner led to one of the largest air and seas searches to that date, and hundreds of ships and aircraft combed thousands of square miles of the Atlantic Ocean, the Gulf of Mexico, and remote locations within the interior of Florida. No trace of the bodies or aircraft was ever found.

Although naval officials maintained that the remains of the six aircraft and 27 men were not found because stormy weather destroyed the evidence, the story of the “Lost Squadron” helped cement the legend of the Bermuda Triangle, an area of the Atlantic Ocean where ships and aircraft are said to disappear without a trace. The Bermuda Triangle is said to stretch from the southern U.S. coast across to Bermuda and down to the Atlantic coast of Cuba and Santo Domingo. (re-post from History.com)

This Navy Veteran would like to wish all Navy Sailors & Airmen,“Fair Winds & Following Seas”.


The Bermuda Triangle?

A source of fascination for sailors, researchers and crackpots alike, the Bermuda Triangle is a roughly 500,000-square-mile expanse of the Atlantic Ocean located off the coast of Florida. Descriptions of its borders vary, but most accounts cite the three points of the “triangle” as Miami, Puerto Rico and the island of Bermuda. Reports of bizarre activity in the region date back to the days of Christopher Columbus, who reported unusual compass activity while traveling through it en route to the New World, but the Triangle would later earn a reputation as a dead zone for planes and ships after a string of unexplained disappearances in the 20th century. In 1945, five U.S. Navy aircraft known as “Flight 19” got lost and vanished in the triangle during a training mission. While the pilots most likely ran out of fuel and crashed into the sea, no trace of the planes or their 14 crewmembers was ever found. Another famous mystery dates to 1963, when the tanker ship SS Marine Sulphur Queen sank near Key West, Florida. Life preservers and other items were later discovered drifting in the water, but the exact cause of the disaster remains unknown, and the wreck has never been recovered.

Writers like Charles Berlitz helped popularize the Bermuda Triangle mystery in the 1960s and 1970s, and its treacherous reputation has since been chalked up to everything from intergalactic portals and time vortexes to paranormal phenomena and even the lost city of Atlantis. But despite the hysteria, government organizations and shipping companies don’t show the triangle on any official maps, and groups ranging from the U.S. Coast Guard to the global insurance outfit Lloyd’s of London maintain that the region doesn’t have an unusually high rate of maritime disasters. Other skeptics note that the triangle sits in an area famous for rogue waves and storms, and they blame any disappearances on extreme ocean depths and the effects of the Gulf Stream, which can combine to quickly erase all evidence of plane crashes and shipwrecks.

At 2:10 p.m., five U.S. Navy Avenger torpedo-bombers comprising Flight 19 take off from the Ft. Lauderdale Naval Air Station in Florida on a routine three-hour training mission. Flight 19 was scheduled to take them due east for 120 miles, north for 73 miles, and then back over a final 120-mile leg that would return them to the naval base. They never returned.

Two hours after the flight began, the leader of the squadron, who had been flying in the area for more than six months, reported that his compass and back-up compass had failed and that his position was unknown. The other planes experienced similar instrument malfunctions. Radio facilities on land were contacted to find the location of the lost squadron, but none were successful. After two more hours of confused messages from the fliers, a distorted radio transmission from the squadron leader was heard at 6:20 p.m., apparently calling for his men to prepare to ditch their aircraft simultaneously because of lack of fuel.

By this time, several land radar stations finally determined that Flight 19 was somewhere north of the Bahamas and east of the Florida coast, and at 7:27 p.m. a search and rescue Mariner aircraft took off with a 13-man crew. Three minutes later, the Mariner aircraft radioed to its home base that its mission was underway. The Mariner was never heard from again. Later, there was a report from a tanker cruising off the coast of Florida of a visible explosion seen at 7:50 p.m.

The disappearance of the 14 men of Flight 19 and the 13 men of the Mariner led to one of the largest air and seas searches to that date, and hundreds of ships and aircraft combed thousands of square miles of the Atlantic Ocean, the Gulf of Mexico, and remote locations within the interior of Florida. No trace of the bodies or aircraft was ever found.

By this time, several land radar stations finally determined that Flight 19 was somewhere north of the Bahamas and east of the Florida coast, and at 7:27 p.m. a search and rescue Mariner aircraft took off with a 13-man crew. Three minutes later, the Mariner aircraft radioed to its home base that its mission was underway. The Mariner was never heard from again. Later, there was a report from a tanker cruising off the coast of Florida of a visible explosion seen at 7:50 p.m.

The disappearance of the 14 men of Flight 19 and the 13 men of the Mariner led to one of the largest air and seas searches to that date, and hundreds of ships and aircraft combed thousands of square miles of the Atlantic Ocean, the Gulf of Mexico, and remote locations within the interior of Florida. No trace of the bodies or aircraft was ever found.

Although naval officials maintained that the remains of the six aircraft and 27 men were not found because stormy weather destroyed the evidence, the story of the “Lost Squadron” helped cement the legend of the Bermuda Triangle, an area of the Atlantic Ocean where ships and aircraft are said to disappear without a trace. The Bermuda Triangle is said to stretch from the southern U.S. coast across to Bermuda and down to the Atlantic coast of Cuba and Santo Domingo.

Bermunda Triangle Mystery: What happened to the USS Cyclops


The Lost Patrol: Flight 19 mystery inching closer to being solved

They are heroes and they are ghosts. More than a dozen Navy and Marine pilots flew off into history and mystery. They were never heard from again, or were they?

Flight 19 -- The Lost Patrol -- consisted of 14 crewmen in five Avenger torpedo bombers that took off from Naval Air Station Fort Lauderdale on Dec. 5, 1945.

U.S. Army combat helicopter pilot Capt. Jon Myhre has spent more than 30 years searching for them and he wrote a book about it.

"I think I've figured out what happened but I'm still searching," he said. "I think two planes crash-landed in Florida and three of them crashed off the coast of Florida in the Atlantic but [I'm] still on the hunt."

There has been lots of speculation about the cause of the disappearance.

"Pilot confusion, equipment malfunction, stronger than anticipated winds," Myhre said.

A lot of World War II-era planes have been found in the ocean and in the Everglades, and some searchers have been quick to conclude they were the remains of Flight 19.

Others have been just as quick to figure the squadron was swallowed up by the Bermuda Triangle, also known as the Devil's Triangle, but Myhre doesn't buy it.

"The biggest problem was the winds," he said. "When they took off the winds were southwesterly between 30 and 40 miles an hour and by the time they disappeared, later in the afternoon, the winds were probably up in the neighborhood of 45 – 50 miles an hour."

Myhre believes two of the planes crashed on land near Sebastian, in Central Florida and three splashed down in the ocean off Daytona Beach but the crew would not have survived long in the water.

"I talked to a gentleman who was a sea captain in the Navy and he was in the area where the planes disappeared and he said they were the highest seas he's ever seen," Myhre said. "When they took off it was reasonably decent weather but by the time they crashed in the dark sometime after 7 p.m. the weather was atrocious."

There was talk that radioman Sgt. George Paonessa survived, went AWOL, and lived anonymously for years, even sending his family a telegram using his nickname "Georgie" but most believe it was a hoax.

A memorial, honoring the lost crew members, was erected next to the Control Tower at Fort Lauderdale-Hollywood International Airport and it features a propellor from an Avenger torpedo bomber.

"That's a beautiful memorial," Myhre said. "I was here for the original dedication in 1991."

There are plenty of Flight 19 artifacts at the Fort Lauderdale Naval Air Station museum, not far from the memorial, and they make one wonder if the planes will ever be found.


Around 7:15 AM this morning, a single-engine propeller aircraft arrived in the vicinity of the United States Air Force restricted flight zone and used an abandoned military radio frequency to demand permission to land on the installation.

The pilot ignored several warnings from the tower operators, insisting that his obsolete aircraft was a military vehicle belonging to the U.S. Air Force.

The craft was finally escorted to the airfield by two F-14 jet fighters and landed on the airfield under close scrutiny.

The base’s security staff was extremely surprised to see two disoriented old men wearing WW2 uniforms come out of the cockpit, visibly confused.

According to U.S. Air Force spokesman, Colonel James Miller, the two men claimed to be have disappeared in 1945 and have no memory of what happened to them over the last 75 years.

“They asked us if the war with Japan was over and who had won. These old guys seemed visibly confused.”

Colonel Miller says the men’s fingerprints and teeth seem to match the military records of the men they claim to be, Lt. James Monroe and Captain David Smith Jr., but they seem to be much younger than they should.

“They look around 65 years old when they should be over 110 years old. It’s as if they had gotten lost in a type of warp zone where time is slowed.”

Both men will undergo a thorough medical examination and interrogation to try and determine the veracity of their story and what may have happened to them.

Colonel Miller says the aircraft is authentic and the crew’s story seems legitimate, but the U.S. Air Force will open an investigation to try and determine what really happened to them and their lost comrades in 1945.

The aircraft was authenticated as one of five planes part of Flight 19 which disappeared over the Bermuda Triangle in December 1945.

Flight 19 was taking part in routine navigation and combat training exercises in TBM-type aircraft when they lost radio contact and disappeared.

None of the planes were ever found, and another craft even disappeared while searching for them.

Unfortunately, the two men seem to have no memory of what happened to them during their ordeal, so the mystery remains total concerning the faith of the other aircrafts.


Flight 19: Has mystery of Lost Patrol been solved?

When five Navy torpedo bombers took off from Fort Lauderdale in December 1945 and failed to return, they created one of the greatest aviation mysteries of all time and popularized the myth of the Bermuda Triangle.

Now two aviation sleuths, who have spent more than 25 years trying to crack the case, have a compelling new theory: They believe that a torpedo bomber discovered in western Broward County in 1989 belonged to the lead pilot of Flight 19 and that some of the other planes also crashed on land.

"The circumstantial evidence we've amassed is pretty conclusive," said Jon Myhre, a former Palm Beach International Airport controller. "Nobody had connected the dots before."

Without knowing each other, the two men independently studied the "Lost Patrol" from various angles to calculate where the planes might have gone down while on a routine training mission.

Myhre, of Sebastian, wrote a book, Discovery of Flight 19, about his investigation. After reading it, Andy Marocco, the other enthusiast, called Myhre, and they began collaborating.

"It all started falling right in line," Marocco said.

Marocco, a California businessman, was the one who discovered new information that might break open the 68-year-old mystery. He went to the National Archives and obtained the Navy's 500-page "Board of Investigation Report on the loss of Flight 19."

In it, he found that the USS Solomons aircraft carrier, while off the coast of Daytona Beach, picked up a radar signal from four to six unidentified planes over North Florida, about 20 miles northwest of Flagler Beach.

That was at 7 p.m. on Dec. 5 1945, or about an hour and half after Flight 19 was due back at Naval Air Station Fort Lauderdale — today, Fort Lauderdale-Hollywood International Airport.

While at an altitude of about 4,000 feet and flying about 135 mph, the planes then made a turn to a compass heading of 170 degrees, or southeast, important details never before factored into the Flight 19 disappearance, the two men said.

Based on the southeast course, Myhre and Marocco recalculated that at least one of the single-engine, eight-ton planes would have crashed within miles of where the torpedo bomber was found 25 years ago.

That wreckage was spotted by a Broward Sheriff's helicopter pilot in the Everglades about 10 miles west of the Alligator Alley toll booth and about one mile north of the highway.

At the time, several experts, including Myhre, concluded the plane could not have come from Flight 19 because it was too far from where the Navy had received its last vague fix on the squadron, about 150 miles east of Daytona Beach, over the Atlantic.

Myhre and Marocco now say it's fully possible the USS Solomons was tracking the Lost Patrol. Because it was night and there was bad weather, the pilots probably had no idea they had meandered over land, Marocco said.

To bolster their case, they checked photos of the cockpit of the 1989 plane and determined it was a TBM Avenger-3, the exact model flown by Lt. Charles Taylor, the commander of Flight 19.

From an Internet search, they say a rubber heel found at the wreckage site came from a size 11 or 12 dress shoe that would fit a man at least 6 feet tall. "Charles Taylor was 6-foot-1," Marocco said.

Meanwhile, the Navy has no record of a TBM-3 Avenger missing in or around Florida between 1944 and 1952 — other than Charles Taylor's plane — further leaving open the possibility the Everglades wreck belonged to Flight 19.

Until now, most military and history buffs believed the 14 crew members of Flight 19 perished when their planes ran out of fuel and crashed in the Atlantic.

Because the planes disappeared without a trace, Flight 19 bolstered the myth of the Bermuda Triangle, the area between Miami, Puerto Rico and Bermuda, where hundreds of planes and ships have purportedly vanished.

To confirm their theory on the Lost Patrol, the two men need to re-inspect the plane in the Everglades and find Navy bureau numbers on its wings that would match up with those on Taylor's torpedo bomber.

The problem is they can't find the wreckage.

They fear hunters, air boaters or others who roam Everglades may have taken pieces of the wreckage as souvenirs, particularly after its discovery was publicized in 1989. Still, they hope someone with an interest in digging up history will help them financially to mount an expedition.

"To this day we still can't find an exact location," Marocco said. "But if we find that plane again, I think we'll be able to positively identify it."

What happened to the other planes? Marocco thinks they scattered in different directions — while over Florida — in hopes they would pick up a homing signal to either an aircraft carrier or an airport. He noted two of the planes were flown by Navy crews, three by Marine crews.

"I think they scattered, based on their allegiance to their military unit," Marocco said. "The three Marine planes went toward the Gulf of Mexico and the two Navy planes went south. I think they all ran out of fuel and crashed."

Myhre and Marocco say to this point, the Navy has been of little help in determining whether the Everglades plane was part of Flight 19.

Paul Taylor, spokesman for the Naval History and Heritage Command in Washington, D.C., said the Navy needs more information.

"We're open to hearing more about the theory and welcome the gentlemen to forward their findings to us for closer examination," he said.


Lost patrol in Bermuda Triangle still a mystery 72 years later

A U.S. Navy squadron of five Avenger torpedo-bombers, known as Flight 19, took off on a routine, three-hour training mission, leaving the Ft. Lauderdale Naval Air Station on Dec. 5, 1945, just after 2 p.m. and never returned. To this day, 72 years later, the disappearance is an enduring mystery and helped fuel the enigma surrounding the Bermuda Triangle, also known as the Devil’s Triangle.

Two hours into the flight, the squadron leader, Lt. Charles Taylor, radioed that his flight instruments, including his compass, had failed and that he didn’t know where he was, according to History.com. The other 13 members of the squadron also reported instrument failure.

“After two more hours of confused messages from the flyers, a distorted radio transmission from the squadron leader was heard at 6:20 p.m., apparently calling for his men to prepare to ditch their aircraft simultaneously because of lack of fuel,” History.com said.

A Mariner aircraft with a 13-man crew took off on a search and rescue mission just before 7:30 p.m., looking for the lost patrol. After a radio message three minutes into the flight, that aircraft was never heard from again, although a tanker reported an explosion off the Florida coast just before 8 p.m.


On This Day Aircraft squadron lost in the Bermuda Triangle

Two hours after the flight began, the leader of the squadron, who had been flying in the area for more than six months, reported that his compass and back-up compass had failed and that his position was unknown. The other planes experienced similar instrument malfunctions. Radio facilities on land were contacted to find the location of the lost squadron, but none were successful. After two more hours of confused messages from the fliers, a distorted radio transmission from the squadron leader was heard at 6:20 p.m., apparently calling for his men to prepare to ditch their aircraft simultaneously because of lack of fuel.

By this time, several land radar stations finally determined that Flight 19 was somewhere north of the Bahamas and east of the Florida coast, and at 7:27 p.m. a search and rescue Mariner aircraft took off with a 13-man crew. Three minutes later, the Mariner aircraft radioed to its home base that its mission was underway. The Mariner was never heard from again. Later, there was a report from a tanker cruising off the coast of Florida of a visible explosion seen at 7:50 p.m.

The disappearance of the 14 men of Flight 19 and the 13 men of the Mariner led to one of the largest air and seas searches to that date, and hundreds of ships and aircraft combed thousands of square miles of the Atlantic Ocean, the Gulf of Mexico, and remote locations within the interior of Florida. No trace of the bodies or aircraft was ever found.


What is the Bermuda Triangle Really?

There is no argument, the Bermuda Triangle has strange stories where people have gone missing. Many theories have been made on many blogs, reddit threads and even just personal opinions. But what is the truth? The truth is hard to come by. Maybe it really was just storms, but if that was the case why are there not more transcripts from the Captains reporting a storm.

In some cases I do believe that some ships and planes fell victims to storms, like El Faro. Though in the instant of flight 19, that leaves me speechless. It really is shocking, there was no panic or distress in the pilots voice. There were reports of confusion and disorientation. In the buzzfeed episode they mention how it could have been a malfunctioning compass which led to their downfall. But rest assured we may never know the answer. It’s nice thinking that maybe it could be a blackhole where people are taken to live in the lost city of Atlantis. But the realist in me knows better.

I hope those that have lost people have found piece in knowing people are interested in their stories. All I know is that I will not be cruising from Florida to Bermuda anytime soon. I mean it is better safe than sorry.