Islam, the Quran, and the Five Pillars All Without a Flamewar: Crash Course World History #13

Islam, the Quran, and the Five Pillars All Without a Flamewar: Crash Course World History #13


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In which John Green teaches you the history of Islam, including the revelation of the Qu'ran to Muhammad, the five pillars of Islam, how the Islamic empire got its start, the Rightly Guided Caliphs, and more. Learn about hadiths, Abu Bakr, and whether the Umma has anything to do with Uma Thurman (spoiler alert: it doesn't). Also, learn a little about the split between Sunni and Shia Muslims, and how to tell if this year's Ramadan is going to be difficult for your Muslim friends. Let's try to keep the flame wars out of this reasoned discussion.

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Islam, the Quran,& the Five Pillars All Without a Flamewar: Crash Course Ep. 13

Want to include videos that keep students accountable, in your classroom? In which John Green teaches you the history of Islam, including the revelation of the Qu'ran to Muhammad, the five pillars of Islam, how the Islamic empire got its start, the Rightly Guided Caliphs, and more. Learn about hadiths, Abu Bakr, and whether the Umma has anything to do with Uma Thurman (spoiler alert: it doesn't). Also, learn a little about the split between Sunni and Shia Muslims, and how to tell if this year's Ramadan is going to be difficult for your Muslim friends. Let's try to keep the flame wars out of this reasoned discussion.

Here is what is included in this 6-page download:

1. Note Taking Guide for Students: This is essentially a blank section to take notes in.

2. Summary of the Video: A place for the students to write a short summary of what they have watched.

3. Teacher Notes from the: My 1 page of notes.

4. Vocabulary Section: I have chosen 3 words that would be good to have the students look up. I also have them write each of the words in a sentence.

5. Quiz for students / with answers: There is a 7 question quiz with answers from the episode. It can be taken in class or taken home. I think in class would be better.

6. Blank Template for student created quiz: I decided to add this to every Crash Course guide as it works really well with students.

**Also, I highly recommend having the students watch this on .5 speed. If you click the wheel on the bottom of the youtube video you can adjust the speed.

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Student Series! Islam & The Five Pillars

Islam is the second largest religion in the world, with about 1.5 billion followers worldwide. Islam, meaning “submission,” reflects its total absolute devotion to the acceptance of Allah (God) to be the one and only almighty creator who sent Muhammad to be the final prophet to explain previous beliefs and redirect people to the one true religion. Muhammad, around forty years of age, was enlightened through the angel Gabriel and set on this journey to do to share and recite his word of God. The Quran, the holy scripture of Islam, is believed to be the exact words of God himself, from Muhammad’s written revelations, rather than the interpretation of Muhammad.

Like most religions, such as Christianity, Islam is split into denominations that differ in how they chose to practice the religion with the same major fundamental concepts. Sunni and Shiites are the two major denominations in Islam. Both Sunnis and Shiites agree on the essential details for carrying out the five pillars, but differ on focused practices and ways of believing and pursuing how to be a Muslim. The foundations of what makes a Muslim a Muslim are the obedience of the five pillars of the Islamic faith.

(via)

Shahadah

The first pillar indicates submission to Islam by reciting the declaration “There is no God but Allah and Muhammad is His prophet.” Thus accepting Muhammad to be the messenger of God and to devote oneself completely to this one and only almighty true monotheistic God.

(via)

Salah

Is the ritual of praying 5 times a day early just before dawn, at noon, in mid-afternoon, just after sunset, and in the evening, between an hour after sunset and midnight towards the direction of Mecca, in the most ultimate state of purity of the mind, heart, and soul. This is the behavior aspect of Shahadah being put into practice.

Specific movements done during this prayer represent the submission of faith while reciting the opening of the Quran, the Surah al-Fatihah, with their hands raised to their ears symbolizing that they have heard and received the message, now accepting and following Allah through this demonstrated devotion of prayer. Followed by bowing and kneeling movements with repeating other verses from the Quran for each specific movement. This constant reaffirmation and engaging of prayer ends with a personal prayer of calling upon Muhammad and Allah to answer their requested blessings. This cycle is repeated 3 times to complete the cycle.

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Zakat

The third pillar is all about giving back to the less fortunate as a reminder of the need of giving back to community. One fourteenth of a person’s income, 2.5%, should be given to to a religious official or representative of the Islamic state or to a representative of a local mosque.

(via)

The fourth pillar is the fasting month known as Ramadan, from sunrise to sunset. Restrictions of refraining from food, drinking, and sexual activities during day time represent the pain and hunger of hunger as well as what one is willing to go through for God and is a reminder of their awareness of this purifying act.

(via)

The fifth pillar is the pilgrimage to Mecca to perform the nine rites required if one is financially and physically capable. These nine rites are:


Erasing the Foreignness of Islam

In the video we saw in class, Islam, the Quran, and the Five Pillars All Without a Flamewar: Crash Course World History #13, John Green was describing the monotheistic beliefs of Islam called Shahada when he said:
‘There is no god but god and Muhammad is god’s prophet,’ which is sometimes translated as, ‘There is no god but allah and Muhammad is allah’s prophet’ which tries to make Muslims sound other and ignores the fact that the word for god whether you’re Christian or Jewish or Muslim is allah. (3:33)
This got me thinking about how, growing up, I never really knew much about Islam other than what I saw on the news. Much of what I heard attempted to make people who followed the Islamic faith seem mysterious and scary by making them sound foreign and other just as John Green pointed out in the video. If people take the time to educate themselves, they would find that, in fact, Islam bears a striking resemblance to Christianity. Since Christianity is currently the dominant religion in America, it is widely thought of as rather familiar and domestic, therefore making it the opposite of foreign and other.

John brings up a few ways in which Islam and Christianity are very similar. He describes how, in the Islamic faith, there is only one great god. This is a concept that is echoed in the Christian faith. John also said, “Just as Jesus and Moses sought to restore Abrahamic monotheism after what they perceived as straying, so too did Muhammad.”(2:18) He was pointing out how both religions accept the idea that there were people who brought the word of god to humanity after humanity began to stray from god’s plan.

Other similarities that I had noticed included the Islamic practice of Zakat which is the act of “giv[ing] a percentage of their income to the poor.”(4:23) This sounds very similar to the Christian tradition of tithing which involves giving a tenth of one’s earnings to the church or government so that it may go toward the upkeep of the church and toward helping the poor of the community. The Islamic pillar of Salat also has a Christian counterpart. Although Salat is very specific about the direction in which people pray, its timing is still rather consistent with the times in a day when Christians prey. In the video, John explains that Salat dictates that people prey “at dawn, noon, afternoon, sunset, and evening.”(3:50) Since many Christians hold the tradition of praying before meals and before they go to bed, they too end up praying at dawn for breakfast, at noon for lunch, at sunset for supper, and in the evening before bed.

Watching the video in class gave me a lot more information about Islam that led me to understand how many parallels Islam has to Christianity. If Christianity is thought of as the opposite of foreign and other and Islam resembles Christianity in many ways, then Islam would also be thought of as familiar, the opposite of foreign and other. This destroys any mystery or scary effect that Islam may have been shrouded in.


Josenmiami Religious Studies

In which John Green teaches you the history of Islam, including the revelation of the Qu'ran to Muhammad, the five pillars of Islam, how the Islamic empire got its start, the Rightly Guided Caliphs, and more. Learn about hadiths, Abu Bakr, and whether the Umma has anything to do with Uma Thurman (spoiler alert: it doesn't). Also, learn a little about the split between Sunni and Shia Muslims, and how to tell if this year's Ramadan is going to be difficult for your Muslim friends. Let's try to keep the flame wars out of this reasoned discussion.

8 comments:

Influential video that described the complexity of the Quran in a few short minutes and allowed me to understand it in an easier way.

This video was full of information. From the history of Islam to the difference between Sunni and Shia Muslims. I love John Green videos because he says so much information in a way that students can capture and really understand.

Melany Sanchez
PID 5063302

I really didn't know too much about Islam or the Qu'ran, but I now feel that I have a better understanding of it. There is still a lot that I don't know about it, but I think this video was brief enough for me to understand.

The five pillars of Islam is extremely interesting to me. The fasting part is what always fascinates me the most. I have never voluntarily fasted and would actually like to give it a try one day

Andrea Perez Power
PID: 5058098

This video explains a lot about the Islam and the Muslim community. Although it is a world religion just as Christianity and Judaism, and its beginnings were also in the East coast of the Mediterranean, Islam is the religion that we know the least.
John explains the five pillars of this religions, the main aspects that are followed by its followers.
Shahada: the fact that there is no other God than Allah, and that Muhammed is his prophet.
Salat: the five prayers that muslims need to do during the day, depending on the height of the sun.
Sawn: the time of the year where Muslims need to fast during the sunlight. No parties, no cigarettes. It is called Ramadam, and it lasts for a month.
Zakat: Muslims are required to give certain percentage of their income to the poor.
Hajj: Islamic pilgrimage to Mecca, a mandatory religious duty that must be completed at least once in lifetime.

When John greens talks about the five pillars of islam it is really interesting to me all the little things they do throughout their day or week, Especially the fasting part.

The Quran is really interesting because, unlike the New Testament or the Torah, it was recited directly by God to Muhammad (largely through the Archangel Gabriel). This means that Muhammad is the last of the prophets in the Abrahamic faiths, which means that Islam is deferential to Judaism and Christianity as "people of the books." I think this might have something to do with why, in many countries where Jews, Muslims, and Christians live, they are not always inclined to violence against each other.


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Crash Course 9 Watch VideoIslam, the Quran, and the Five

Watch VideoIslam, the Quran, and the Five Pillars All Without a Flamewar: Crash Course World History #13Duration: 12:53
User: n/a – Added: 4/19/12Watch the video then answer the questions listed below.Islam: World History Crash Course #13

1. Islam’s story begins in the ________________ when the angel __________ appeared to _____________________ and told him to begin reciting the word of God. Slowly he came to accept the mantle of ______________.

2. Why do Muslims believe that God sent Muhammad as the final prophet?

3. List and describe the five pillars of Islam below:a. Shahada -b. Salat -c. Sawm -d. Zakat -e. _______ – the pilgrimage to Mecca that Muslims must try to fulfill at least once in their life

4. The Quraysh forced Muhammad and his followers out of Mecca in ______________ and so they headed to Medina. This journey marks ______________ in the Islamic calendar. In addition to being an important prophet, Muhammad was a _________________ and in 630 CE, the Islamic community took back Mecca. Muhammad later died in __________.

5. After Muhammad’s death, an initial disagreement between Muhammad’s father-in-law, Abu Bakr, and Muhammad’s son-in-law, Ali over who would become Caliph began the divide between the two major sects of Islam: ______________ and _________________.

6. Why does John Green argue that people of Western European descent remain largely ignorant about the time-period in which Islam arose? (hint: he answers the question before he makes the statement)

7. What’s the most interesting thing you learned about Muslims/Islam/Muhammad that you didn’t know prior to watching this Crash Course World History video?


Spatial Diffusion

The spread of Islam was accomplished through trade and conquest. Mecca was a center of trade. When camel caravans left Mecca, they carried Muhammad’s teachings with them. Islam diffused from Mecca and spread throughout the Middle East and into Central Asia and North Africa. The geographic principle of spatial diffusion can be applied to any phenomenon, idea, disease, or concept that spreads through a population across space and through time. The spatial diffusion of Islam outward from Mecca was significant and predictable.

Early on, the unifying principles of Islam found their way into the regional groups of Arabia and into the minds of their leaders. By 700 CE, Islam had spread to the east, to the Mogul Empire of Pakistan and northern India. In India, the Emperor Shah Jehan, who built the famous architectural marvel of the Taj Mahal as a mausoleum for his wife, was a Muslim. The expansion of Islam fueled the Arab Empire of the Middle East. The capital city of the Arab Empire was first established at Medina and then moved to Damascus and later to Baghdad. While Europe was enduring the Dark Ages, Islam was experiencing a renaissance, expanding its knowledge of mathematics, architecture, and the sciences. The Arab institutions of higher learning kept the Greek classics alive and established universities in Toledo (Spain), Cairo, and Baghdad. As of 2010, Islam has attracted as many as 1.5 billion followers, second only to Christianity, which has about 2 billion followers. Hinduism is third, with about 900 million followers. Buddhism is considered the world’s fourth-largest religion.


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It's very easy to get quality ebooks )

so many fake sites. this is the first one which worked! Many thanks

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Just select your click then download button, and complete an offer to start downloading the ebook. If there is a survey it only takes 5 minutes, try any survey which works for you.


Med lag med imponerende arkitektur, en forlegenhet på kunstneriske mesterverk, utallige gamle skatter og en matkultur å dø for, er den evige byen en av verdens største byer. Slike rike tilbud utviklet seg i tusenvis av år etter hvert som det vokste fra små bosetninger til summende storbyer - vedvarende det romerske rikets oppgang og fall, dannelsen av de pavelige statene, renessansen og Italiens forening underveis. Som det sier, ble Roma ikke bygget på en dag. Men hvor kommer nettopp denne setningen fra?

Den første kjente referansen til ordtaket var ikke laget av en romersk, eller til og med en italiensk, men av et tolvte århundre kloster i retten i Phillippe Alsace, Grev av Flandern, i dagens Belgia. Innspilt som "Roma, " ble uttrykket fanget i et middelaldersk fransk dikt som dateres til 1190, som ble publisert i boken Li Proverbe au Vilain av den sveitsiske språkforskeren Adolf Tobler i 1895.

Tre århundrer etter å ha blitt uttalt i en domstol i Flandern, kom uttrykket på engelsk i Richard Taverners oversettelse av Desiderius Erasmus &aposarbeid, Adages.

Omkring samme tid, i 1538, inkluderte dramatiker og forfatter John Heywood det i sitt arbeid, En dialog som inneholdt tallet i effekt av alle ordsprogene i engelskspråket, eller ordsprogene for kort: "Roma ble ikke knust på en dane (quoth han) og likevel stod tyll det var fynysht. Roma ble ikke bygget &apos.

Selv om de vises i en mye lengre form, mange kreditere denne spesielle bruken som det punktet uttrykket virkelig tok av. Heywood var kjent for sine skuespill og dikt, men det var hans samling av ordsprog som virkelig gjorde ham kjent. Han har kanskje ikke trodd dem helt, men en rekke uttrykk i boken. Ordspråkene er fortsatt til vanlig bruk i dag. "Utenfor synet, ute av tankene", "bedre sent enn aldri" og "jo mer merrier" ble alle dokumentert av Heywood.

Kort etter Heywoods publikasjon begynte andre forfattere å sitere eller tilpasse uttrykket, og det ble til og med brukt av Queen Elizabeth I i 1563 under en adresse i Cambridge. God gammel Lizzie valgte å sette poenget sitt på latin:

&aposHæc tamen vulgaris sententia meg aliquantulum recreavit, qué etsi non auferre, tamen minuere possit dolorem meum, quæem sententia er est romam uno die non fuisse conditam&apos.

Med andre ord, "Men dette vanlige ordtaket har gitt meg en viss mengde trøst - et ordtak som ikke kan ta bort, men i det minste kan redusere, den sorg jeg føler og det er sagt at Roma ikke ble bygget på en dag.

Mer nylig ble Roma ikke bygget på en dag, navnet på en 1962 sjelsang av Johnnie Taylor og en 2000-sang av elektronisk band Morcheeba.


Watch the video: Buddha and Ashoka: Crash Course World History #6