Adrian Allinson

Adrian Allinson

Adrian Allinson, the eldest son of a doctor who had been struck off the Medical Register for his over-vigorous promotion of vegetarianism and contraception, was born in 1890. His mother, a German Jew, had studied portrait painting in Berlin.

According to David Boyd Haycock, Allinson was expelled from Wycliffe College, because of his atheism. Allinson began his medical studies but soon transferred to the Slade School of Fine Art.

Allinson made friends with a group of very talented students. This included C.R.W. Nevinson, Stanley Spencer, John S. Currie, Mark Gertler, Maxwell Gordon Lightfoot, Edward Wadsworth and Rudolph Ihlee. This group became known as the Coster Gang. According to David Boyd Haycock this was "because they mostly wore black jerseys, scarlet mufflers and black caps or hats like the costermongers who sold fruit and vegetables from carts in the street". Nevinson argued in his autobiography, Paint and Prejudice (1937) commented that the Slade "was full with a crowd of men such as I have never seen before or since."

Adrian Allinson remarked how the naked female models at the Slade School of Fine Art with their wandering glances "seemed to share dark and unholy secrets" with the young artists. C.R.W. Nevinson, John S. Currie Maxwell Gordon Lightfoot and Edward Wadsworth all began relationships with models. The author of A Crisis of Brilliance (2009) has argued: "Allinson, still a virgin at twenty-two, was fed up at being unable to join Nevinson and Wadsworth in their comparisons of libidinous adventures. He used the new-found wealth from his Slade scholarship to procure one of the prostitutes who promenaded outside the Alhambra Theatre. He caught a venereal infection, but the escapade impressed his companions."

After graduation in 1910, he continued his studies in Munich and Paris. In February 1911, Allison exhibited with C.R.W. Nevinson, Mark Gertler, Maxwell Gordon Lightfoot, Vanessa Bell, Duncan Grant and Rudolph Ihlee at the Alpine Club Gallery in Mill Street, Mayfair. He then joined forces with Augustus John, Percy Wyndham Lewis, Walter Bayes, Walter Sickert, Harold Gilman, Henry Lamb, Spencer Gore, Lucien Pissarro, James Manson, Robert Bevan and Charles Ginner to form the Camden Town Group.

In July 1912, John S. Currie, Dora Henry and Mark Gertler went on holiday to Ostend. They had a good time but Gertler showed concern about Currie's behavior. He suggested that Currie's love of the writings of Friedrich Nietzsche had left him immoral. Allinson pointed out that Currie was insanely jealous of Dolly: "Violent jealously continually drove Currie to threats of murder... Dolly's beauty, and pity for her lot, aroused in more than one painter the desire to replace the Irishman, so that Currie's jealousy, originally groundless, in time created the conditions for its own justification."

In 1913 Allison and several members of the Camden Town Group joined forces with the Vorticists to form the London Group. This included Edward Wadsworth, David Bomberg, C.R.W. Nevinson, Henri Gaudier-Brzeska, William Roberts, Alvin Langdon Coburn, Malcolm Arbuthnot, Lawrence Atkinson, Frederick Etchells, Cuthbert Hamilton, Jessica Dismorr, Helen Saunders and Dorothy Shakespear.He was also a member of the the New English Art Club.

On 8th October 1914, John S. Currie murdered Dolly Henry. The Times reported the following day. "A young woman, whose name is said to be Dorothy or Eileen Henry, was found fatally shot in a house in Chelsea... At a quarter to eight yesterday morning shots and screams were heard. The other occupants of the house ran upstairs and found the woman on the landing in her nightdress bleeding from wounds. In the bedroom a man partly dressed was discovered with wounds in the chest. He was taken to Chelsea infirmary, but the woman died before the arrival of a doctor." Currie died three days later. His final words were: "It was all so ugly".

Adrian Allinson was a pacifist and during the First World War associated with members of the Bloomsbury Group such as Mark Gertle, Vanessa Bell, Clive Bell, Leonard Woolf, Lytton Strachey, David Garnett, and Duncan Grant. During the war he produced drawings for The Daily Express. He also produced one of his most important paintings, The Café Royal (1916).

After the war Allinson travelled widely, painting landscapes and still life subjects in Italy, Switzerland, Greece, Majorca, Ibiza and Spain. He became a member of the Royal Society of British Artists in 1933 and of the Royal Institute of Oil Painters in 1936. In the 1930s he designed posters for the London Underground. This included Windsor Castle (1934), Hampton Court (1934), St Peter's Church (1937) and Wooton Church (1940). Allinson also worked for the Empire Marketing Board.

During the Second World War, Allinson was selected as a government war artist by the War Artists Advisory Committee (WAAC) and his contribution to the Dig For Victory home front food campaign in his picture: The AFS Dig For Victory in St James’s Square (1942).

After the war, Allinson taught at the City of Westminster College, exhibited at the Royal Academy and designed sets for the Beecham Opera Company.

Adrian Allinson died in 1959.


Legends of America

Adrian, Texas began in 1900 when the Rock Island Railroad established a station in Oldham County. Calvin G. Aten, a former Texas Ranger, first built a dugout for his family west of the townsite. The town gained official status in the summer of 1909 when the railway was completed through that portion of Oldham County and was named for an early farmer by the name of Adrian Cullen. Promotion by an Iowa based Townsite Company quickly attracted prospective farmers and businessmen.

By 1910, Adrian had a post office, a school, a general store, a bank, a blacksmith shop, a pool hall, a lumberyard, a brick factory, and a newspaper called the Adrian Eagle. Just five years later the settlement had added two churches, a drugstore, and telephone service. The Giles Hotel was a famous landmark of early Adrian, which later became the Adrian Mercantile and the Adrian Community Center.

Though populated with businesses, Adrian’s early years saw slow growth in population due to severe droughts and difficulties in maintaining sufficient water supplies. But, Adrian survived to become the midpoint of Route 66 between Chicago and Los Angeles, a popular stopping place for Mother Road travelers.

Vintage picture of the Giles Hotel in Adrian, Texas

Midpoint Cafe in Adrian, Texas, Kathy Weiser-Alexander.

One of the most popular stops in Adrian was, and still is, the Midpoint Café which was first constructed in 1928, a full ten years before paving of Route 66 was completed through Oldham County. The original greasy spoon was known as “Zella’s,” which was a one-room eatery with a dirt floor. Later the café was sold to Dub Edmonds and Jess Fincher, who moved into a modernized building next door and changed its name to “Jesse’s Café.” Though it has changed hands many times over the years, it is one of the few businesses still alive and kicking in Adrian. The town was not incorporated until 1953 and never maintained a population of more than a few hundred.

Today, Adrian is home to just twelve businesses and a little over 150 people. The Midpoint Café remains open and provides a collection of Route 66 memorabilia in the original site of Zelda’s just next door. The oldest continuously operating café on the Texas Mother Road, the café’s name has changed over the years, but the service has remained the same where home-style cooking is served with a smile.

While you’re in Adrian, take a look at the many old buildings that line its main street including the Bent Door Trading Post, once a lively tourist stop that has long since fallen into disrepair. Also visit The Antique Ranch, which has converted an old mechanic’s shop into an antique store and eatery where you can feast on real Texas barbeque. And, don’t forget to check out the Mid-Point Water Tower.

The Bent Door Trading Post is just a shell of its former self by Kathy Weiser-Alexander.

MidPoint Water Tower in Adrian, Texas, by Kathy Weiser-Alexander.

Beyond Adrian, you will continue on the old road for just a few short miles before rejoining I-40 until you reach the Glenrio exit at the New Mexico border.


The print depicts a scene in Mikhail Fokine's ballet Cleopatra, produced by the Diaghilev Ballets Russes in 1909, in the set designed Robert Delaunay in 1918. On the right, the High Priest holds the cup of poison, and before him kneels Amoun, who must drink the poison as the price of his night of love with Cleopatra to left of Cleopatra, Amoun's lover, Ta-hor, pleads with Cleopatra. The print is an enlarged version of the frontispiece to Cleopatra, Impressions of the Russian Ballet 1918, Number One.

By the mid 1920s, there was an increasing interest in the Diaghilev Ballet and material relating to dance in general. Beaumont had already produced a series of booklets on individual Diaghilev Ballets under the series title Impressions of the Russian Ballet and a number of wooden cut-out Diaghilev dancers in their famous roles. He now decided to produce a series of hand coloured prints of typical scenes from the Diaghilev Ballet repertory. He kept no records of when he began publishing the prints nor how many were produced, although he reckoned about twenty, mostly the work of Adrian Allinson, Ethelbert White and Randolf Schwabe who had also worked on Impressions of the Russian Ballet booklets and the wooden figures, and Eileen Mayo.

In all these works, Beaumont strove to capture the exact moments of the ballet as well as artists' interpretations. It is likely that the design of each print followed the painstaking search for accuracy that had characterised the creation of the illustrations for Impressions of the Russian Ballet series, described in Bookseller at the Ballet, choosing the significant moment, watching the ballet night after night to check details of the poses and grouping (not easy when the stage was full of individual dancers and movement), going backstage to sketch scenery and borrow costumes.

Most of the hand-colouring for Impressions of the Russian Ballet booklets was the work of Beaumont and his wife, Alice, and it is possible that both were also involved in colouring the prints, although eventually other artists were employed on both projects.


This screen was painted by the stage-designer, artist, caricaturist and potter Adrian Paul Allison. He designed and made the screen especially for himself, and it stayed in his London studio until his death in 1959.

The scenes on the screen are painted in oils upon glass and represent an allegory of the arts. While the screen is conventional in form, based on eighteenth century French models, it is decorated with jazzy Art Deco patterns and vibrantly coloured scenes painted in a stylized manner. The panels depict a composer writing music, an artist in his studio painting a still-life, a scene in a theatre, and an author at work. The panels also represent the progress of the day, with the composer working at dawn, the artist painting at midday, the theatre representing a typical evening entertainment, and the author "burning the midnight oil" by working late into the night.

This screen was painted by the stage-designer, artist, caricaturist and potter Adrian Paul Allison. He designed and made the screen especially for himself, and it stayed in his London studio until his death in 1959.

The scenes on the screen are painted in oils upon glass and represent an allegory of the arts. While the screen is conventional in form, based on eighteenth century French models, it is decorated with jazzy Art Deco patterns and vibrantly coloured scenes painted in a stylized manner. The panels depict a composer writing music, an artist in his studio painting a still-life, a scene in a theatre, and an author at work. The panels also represent the progress of the day, with the composer working at dawn, the artist painting at midday, the theatre representing a typical evening entertainment, and the author "burning the midnight oil" by working late into the night.


Adrian Allison out as Canton City Schools superintendent

CANTON After a nearly three-hour, closed-door executive session Saturday afternoon, the Canton City Board of Education said Adrian Allison's six-year tenure as superintendent had come to an end, only a couple of days before students and school staff will return from their winter break.

The board didn't give a reason. But it was at least the third executive session the board had held to discuss Allison's status since a verbal confrontation involving him and a student after a McKinley playoff football game Nov. 9.

Board President John "J.R." Rinaldi said, by state law, the duties of the superintendent fall upon the assistant superintendent, who is Dan Nero.

Board member Richard Milligan read a brief statement once the board came out of executive session, which lasted from 12:04 p.m. until about 3 p.m.

"The Canton City Schools Board of Education is authorizing the president of the board to enter into a tentative transition agreement, pending counsel approval, that will lead to the departure of Adrian Allison from the district retroactive to Jan. 4, 2019. The board expresses its thanks to Superintendent Allison for his years of service and wishes him well in the future. The board will have no further comment at this time."

Allison, who did not attend Saturday's meeting, later told The Canton Repository he had agreed to a buyout of his contract. Board members did not comment on the transition agreement, and nothing in it has been finalized.

All five members &mdash Rinaldi, Milligan, Eric Resnick, Mark Dillard and Scott Russ &mdash voted to approve Saturday's action.

Allison, in an interview Saturday afternoon, said he plans to sign the transitional agreement within the next two days. As part of the agreement, he said he would, in essence, resign and the board would pay out the remainder of his contract. He said the board did not ask for his resignation.

"I am entering into a transitional agreement where I resign and they move forward with whatever they need to do for the district moving forward," he said. The sides reached an understanding it would be in the best interest of both sides to move forward, he said.

Allison, who said his signing of the agreement would not be because of the Nov. 9 incident, was hired in January 2013 as the youngest and first black superintendent in the district&rsquos history.

"When I took the job six years ago, I had a choice to make at that time," he said. "&hellip That choice was either sit around and be a caretaker or to be bold and courageous and try to make a difference. I chose to be bold and courageous."

He counts among his accomplishments the implementation of his "Brighter Tomorrow" plan to convert elementary schools and middle schools into specialized academies closing Timken High School, which became a downtown Canton campus for McKinley High School launching a partnership with Kent State University Stark campus so district students could get automatic admission to the college and scholarships and working with the Pro Football Hall of Fame to develop the Johnson Controls Hall of Fame Village, as the school district owns much of the property.

Nero issued a statement saying he was "deeply saddened" and that Allison was a "true visionary in the education field and has made tough decisions to move the district forward," citing his increase in providing counseling for students "in every building" expanding availability of technology at McKinley High School and the AIM Academy providing more focused education in the elementary schools "love of kids and his selfless desire to see the students of Canton succeed and be valued citizens" that "have changed many lives."

Nero wrote, "I know that whichever path he chooses, he will succeed, and we will truly miss his leadership."

The teachers union, the Canton Professional Educators' Association said in a statement that Allison made "some difficult and innovative decisions," that he cared deeply about school employees, students and the community and that "his body of work should not be judged on any singular event but by the overall body of his service to Canton City Schools. In the end, perhaps some of Mr. Allison's initiatives fell short of expectations."

A few people who are supporters of Allison and attended the public portion of the meeting expressed dismay, including former board member Lisa Gissendaner, who served a term (2012-15) on the board that hired Allison as superintendent.

"Why was he terminated? That's what I want to know," she said, confronting Rinaldi and Resnick after the meeting. "Can anybody answer that?"

Rinaldi replied, "Lisa, you'll have the availability to everything in the documents."

"This is terrible for our district right now. Really it is," Gissendaner said. "It's indicative of some personal issues. I know that for a fact. And this is so wrong. . I'm disappointed. OK. I'm really hurt because this district needs Adrian in place.

"For one incident. This is one incident that you're saying is the cause of his termination, and it's not the case. This is personal, and you know it. . And here we are here today &mdash termination of a superintendent who's done a lot for this district," she said. "It's all about the kids. I don't think so."

Resnick said, "I'm not going to respond to nonsense."

"This process has been very transparent," Rinaldi said. "Everybody is given due process. . And once all the details come out, you will see that time has been taken. Once you have seen the documents, then we can have a deeper discussion. Everything we do is about the kids."

Declining to confirm the board had gotten a resignation letter, Rinaldi said, "Everything is pending per legal counsel's approval. Once everything is signed and the counsels have signed off, we'll have a full statement, we'll have the documents and we'll have comment."

He indicated he didn't know how long the district's attorney, Greg Beck, would need to review the materials before they could be released.

When asked if the board would appoint an interim superintendent, Rinaldi said, "We're still reviewing all that."

"Once you see the final documents, I think it will be self-explanatory," Rinaldi said.

Would Allison get a severance payment?

"Everything will be in the documentation," Rinaldi said.

Allison was assistant superintendent when the death of then-Superintendent Chris Smith in 2012 led to him becoming interim superintendent. The board promoted him to the top position a few months later.

During the summer, the board declined to give Allison a multiyear contract, instead renewing him for one year at a base salary of $152,000 that would have expired this July 31. The board, which had required Allison to follow an improvement plan, was required to give him notice by March 1 if it was not going to renew his contract.

In the Nov. 9 incident, Allison said a parent chaperoning the school's band told him band members had been disrespectful to adults at the game and in prior games.

While rebuking the students, one of them, who is gay, tried to interrupt Allison. The superintendent said he replied the student "was a disrespectful little boy or however (you) identify." He said the student was "cussing me out."

Students in messages to the board said Allison had referred to the boy as "or whatever you are," causing the student to cry on the bus ride home from the game.

Allison has denied making a disparaging comment about the boy's sexual orientation. He said he apologized to the student and the student's guardian. He also said he would put in place training for himself and the staff "to ensure that we create an equitable learning environment for all students."

Resnick, who had voted against renewing Allison's contract in the summer, said Allison had not gone far enough in instilling confidence in him or other students who were offended.


Adrian Paul Allinson

Allinson was destined for medicine but gave this up to study at the Slade. He won a prize in his second year and then went on to complete his studies in Paris and Munich. Between 1914-17 Allinson worked as a stage designer for the Beecham Opera Company. He was a committed and outspoken pacifist and as a consequence is said to have argued with William Marchant, owner of the Goupil Gallery, who therefore refused to exhibit his work. In the 1920s or early 30s Allinson taught at Westminster School of Art. He was an active member of the London Group and showed work in all but one of the society's thirty eight exhibitions.


Adrian Allinson

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Adrian Allinson Hampton Court (Poster for London Transport) 1934

If you would like to reproduce an image of a work of art in MoMA’s collection, or an image of a MoMA publication or archival material (including installation views, checklists, and press releases), please contact Art Resource (publication in North America) or Scala Archives (publication in all other geographic locations).

All requests to license audio or video footage produced by MoMA should be addressed to Scala Archives at [email protected] . Motion picture film stills or motion picture footage from films in MoMA’s Film Collection cannot be licensed by MoMA/Scala. For licensing motion picture film footage it is advised to apply directly to the copyright holders. For access to motion picture film stills please contact the Film Study Center. More information is also available about the film collection and the Circulating Film and Video Library.

If you would like to reproduce text from a MoMA publication, please email [email protected] . If you would like to publish text from MoMA’s archival materials, please fill out this permission form and send to [email protected] .

This record is a work in progress. If you have additional information or spotted an error, please send feedback to [email protected] .


The Presidents

  • 1914 – 1919 Harold Gilman
  • 1919 – 1921 No President elected, Robert Bevan had overall responsibility
  • 1921 – 1923 Bernard Adeney
  • 1924 – 1926 Frank Dobson
  • 1926 – 1936 Rupert Lee
  • 1936 – 1937 R.P. Bedford (Chairman)
  • 1937 – 1943 Harold Sandys Williamson (Chairman)
  • 1943 – 48 Elliott Seabrooke. Assumed Presidency during WW2
  • 1948 – 1951 Ruskin Spear
  • 1950 – 1951 John Dodgson
  • 1952 – 1965 Claude Rogers
  • 1966 – 1971 Andrew Forge (1960)
  • 1971 – 1973 Dorothy Mead (1960)
  • 1973 – 1977 Neville Boden (1965)
  • 1977 – 1979 Peter Donnelly (1973)
  • 1979 – 1993 Stan Smith (79-81 period of reorganisation evidence unclear)
  • 1983 (for 24 hours) Dennis Creffield
  • 1993 – 1995 Adrian Bartlett
  • 1995 – 1998 Philippa Beale
  • 1998 – 2000 Matthew Kolakowski
  • 2000 – 2005 Peter Clossick
  • 2005 – 2007 Philip Crozier
  • 2007 – current Susan Haire


Adrian Allinson - History

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Watch the video: Marny u0026 Adrian